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HAPPY HOURS: 

-€ COLLECTION OF SONGS FOR 

SCHOOLS, ACADEMIES, AID THE HOME CIRCLE. 

BT 

HOWARD KINGSBURY 

AND 

ALFRED A. GRALEY. 



P 



i " 

PUBLISHED BY TAINTOR BROTHERS,]' 

fl^fy 678 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. V^ 

^r^^(t*- ^4 



j 



2372. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Princeton Theological Seminary Library 



http://archive.org/details/happyhoursOOking 



HAPPY HOURS: 

A 

COLLECTION OF SONGS 

FOR 

SCHOOLS, ACADEMIES, AND THE HOME CIRCLE, 

BY 

HOWARD KINGSBURY, 



ASSISTED BY 

REV. ALFRED A. GRALEY. 



NEW YORK : 
PUBLISHED BY TAINTOR BROTHERS 

No. 678 BROADWAY. 
1874. 



Butertd aecorcting to Ac! of Congress, in the year i848, by Taihtor Brothers & Co., tn the CterS's Office of the District Court of the United 

States for the Southern District cf New York. 



COPYRIGHT NOTICE — The music and poetry of nearly every piece in this work is copyright property, and " Entered according to Ac\ 
of Congress." No person, therefore, has a right to print, in any form, or for any purpose whatever, either words or music, without first obtaining 
permission from the publishers. 

If words or tunes are desired for anniversaries, or for any other purpose, such permission must first be obtained, otherwise the person using 
them trespasses against the laws of copyright, makes himself liable, and will be held accountable 



PREFACE. 



We desire to call attention to the following paiticulars concerning the book here offered to the public : 

The Elementary Department is intended to afford only a general outline, to guide the teacher in unfolding the fun- 
damental principles of music. 

The majority of the pieces are suitable for children ; while interspersed among these, are others requiring some 
culture and skill in their performance. Our own experience is, that children may, with suitable care, be taught songs 
which at first seem beyond their powers ; and we trust the mistake will not be made of neglecling these entirely, even 
in the case of younger scholars. For higher classes, academies, etc., there will be found no lack of suitable material. 
Many new arrangements from popular German melodies are scattered through the work. A few pieces arranged for 
male voices have been also introduced. 

Our thanks are due to the American Trad Society for the free use of the pieces accredited to " Happy Voices," and 
the " New Songs of Zion ; " also, to Messrs. Ticknor & Fields, from whose Blue and Gold edition of the Poets the 
words from Percival, Tennyson, and Miss Procter have been taken ; and to all others who have given kind permission 
to use valuable copyright pieces. 

The poetical compositions of Mr. E. R. Sill were written expressly for this book >i>d will be found to be an attraft 
ive feature of it. 



Wjluik tfgaic muoTTraa 



ELEMENTS OE MUSIC. 



CHAPTER I. 

§ 1. Notes. 

A. character which represents a musical sound is called a Note. 
All sounds have not the same length, hence different kinds of notes are used. 
The longest note in general use is the whole note, & 



The next in length is the half -note,. 



u " " " " " quarter-note, ' 

" " " " " " eighth-note, J 

" " - " " " sixteenth-note J 

" " " " " " thirtij-second-note, $ 

Each of these notes, as their fractional names imply, is just half as long as the one next preceding; 
and other fractional properties are also true of them in their relations to one another. Hence : 

One whole note is equal to two half-notes(o = ,® ,® ), or to four quarter-notes (s> = f f f f), or to one 
half-note and two quarter-notes(& = ,° f f) &c. And one half-note is equal to two quarter-notes d e = f f), 
or to four eighth-notes (j 5 = J J J *), &c, &c. 

Remark. — The teacher should develop this to greater length, as an accurate idea of the relative value 
of the different notes will be found indispensable to keeping correct time. 

§ 2. Rests. 
Characters are also used to denote the temporary interruption of a succession of musical sounds. 
These are called Rests; they have the same mutual relations as notes, and are similarly named. 

r i ff f 

whole rest, half-rest, quarter-rest, eighth-rest, sixteenth rest, thirty-second-rest. 



4 ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 

As beginners often experience difficulty in distinguishing the whole rest from the half, and the quarter 
from the eighth, it may be of aid to them to compare the whole rest, which is placed under the line, to 
a hat standing upon its crown, so as to hold anything placed in it. The quarter-rest turns to the right, 
while the eighth turns to the left, which may be remembered from the fact, that as the right hand is worth 
more than the left, 60 the rest, which turns to the right, is worth more than that which turns to the left. 

§ 3. The Dot. 
But the division of notes and rests, already made, is not complete. For instance, there is often occasion 
to use a note longer than a half-note, but not so long as a whole note ; or one longer than a quarter, but 
not so long as a half. Here the Dot is used ; its effect being to increase the value, that is, prolong the 
Mound of the note it follows, one half. The same is true of the Dot, when used with rests. Hence : 

?'=H r-rl I -• — r r--rn 

Two dots are also used, in which case the second adds half as much as the first did, and the effect is 
as ioilows : 

f=m r-r.ci I -•■--" r-—"* 

Besides the dot another character, the Hold or Pause, is used to prolong notes and rests. Strictly it 
doubles the length of whatever it is placed over — but general custom allows considerable freedom in its 
use. Its form is "^ and it is placed over the note or rest, as : p ' — ■' 



CHAPTER II. 

§ 1. The Staff. 
Notes differ not only in length, but also in being either high or low. To represent this difference 
(which is called a difference in Pitch), a series of Jive horizontal lines, separated by four intermediate 
spaces, is used. This is called the Staff. The notes are written upon it, and rise in pitch, as they 
approach tho upper degrees of the Staff; the degrees being counted upwards. 



ELEMENTS OP MUSIC. 
Ex. I. 



It often happens that the staff has not sufficient compass to express all the differences of pitch required, 
in which case, other lines are added either below or above, and are called Added or Leger lines. 

§ 2. Letters and Clefs. 
But the notes must be applied to the 6taff in some regular way to be of any service. This is accom- 
plished by means of letters, and of signs called Clefs. The first seven letters of the Alphabet are used 
as names for notes, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, while the clefs show the position of any letter upon the staff. 

The two in general use are the following: 3E and ^T, and they are called respectively the Treble or G 

clef (placed upon the second line), and the Base or F clef, (placed upon the fourth line of the staff). 
These indicate that all notes upon the line on which the clef is, in one case, are called G, and in the other, 
F. Here then we have the means of reckoning our position — for, if one note is G, the next above will 
be A, which is followed by B, and that by C, &c. Or, descending from G, we come first to F, then to E, 
he. Again in the Base clef, starting from F, we rise to G, then to A,&c, and descend to E, then to D,&c. 



ft 






6 


E 

A 


x. 2. 

B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


6 


A 




y 



























-/h 










— 0— 

















-Wd 


'^ 





— & — 


















- 


•J ■* t* 




F 























=9 : 



C D E 

C B A 

* 0- *- 



fj 



~ & « 

edcbau f1? 



Note.— Accuracy and quickness in telling what letter falls upon any degree of the staff, are indispensable to reading music. 
't will be enough (in general) to familiarize the pupil with the G clef. 



6 ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 

CHAPTER III. 

§ 1. The Major Scale. 

There are but seven principal sounds in music, which, ascending or descending in regular order, con- 
stitute the Scale. These sounds are not equally distant from each other, some being separated by a 
whole tone, and some by a half-tone. Examining the following plan we shall see that there are five tones 
and two semi-tones, which latter occur between the third and fourth, and the seventh and eighth. The 
eighth is the beginning of a new Octave (or series of eight notes), and at the same time the conclusion of 
the first Octave. 

Ex. 3. 



1 ° 

F?= 


2 S 


3 tD 


A 


K ° 

5 H 


6 £ 




8 


-M — 



1 


D 
1 

—G — 


i 


a 
1 

—o — 


— <S> 

L 

1 

f3. . 


1 
A 


1 
B 

1 
(9 


C 



The intervals E — F, and B — C, are always half-tones, as may be seen on the key-board of a Piano-forte ; 
E, F; B, C being the keys which are not separated by black keys. 

This is called the Major Scale, because its third is two whole tones above its first; while in the Minor 
Scale, which we now proceed to consider, the third is only a tone and a half above the first. 

§ 2. The Minor Scale. 
There are two varieties of the Minor Scale, the Melodic and Harmonic. Both agree in the essential 
feature just alluded to, in having the third only a tone and a half above the first ; the difference being in 
the sixth and seventh. 



Melodic 
Minor. 



I 



ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 
Ex. 4 



- p 



Harmonic 
Minor. 



P 



i Ex. 5. 



-fca- 



6 * 



To understand these, we must first understand the signs used, & is called a Sharp, and it raises the note 
before which it is placed a half-tone, fa is called a Natural, and it restores the note before which it is placed 
to its original pitch. Besides these, there is the sign U, called a Flat, which lowers the note before which 
it is placed a half-tone. Two Flats (J^) lower the note before which they are placed a whole tone ; and 
two Sharps, or the Double sharp, as it is called (written x) raises the note before which it is placed a whole 
tone. These characters, the #, the j^, and the ij, when occurring in the course of a piece of music, are 
called Accidentals. 

The Harmonic Minor is the more perfect, as it has the same form ascending and descending. — Here 
we notice that there are three whole tones, two half-tones, and one interval, consisting of a tone and a half. 



§ 3. The Chromatic Scale. 

One more scale remains to be considered, and that is called the Chromatic Scale. 
succession of sounds by semi-tones through the octave. 



This consists in a 



ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 

Ex. 6. 



i 



fro-p-fr e 



-p^-p- 



-^^ j ^jj^s 



-a !'©- 



-^W-oyo- 



CHAPTER IV. 

§ 1. Transposition of the Major Scale. 

It is evident that these Major and Minor scales may start from any letter, that is, from any degree of 
the staff, and all the requirements of the case will be met, provided the order of tones and semi-tones be 
preserved throughout the same. Thus, if we choose to start the Major Scale from G, we have only to 
make sure that the semi-tones occur between the third and fourth, and the seventh and eighth, the remain- 
ing intervals being whole tones, and our new scale is as perfect as the old one. To accomplish this we 
insert a ti before the seventh, and we find the order is the same. 



Ex. 



« 



#— ^-1 



The ft raises the seventh a half-tone, and thus the semi-tone, which in the previous example (Chap. III., 
\ 1), came between B and C, now comes between F and G. Suppose we wish to start from F, we have 
only to insert a U before B, which brings a semi-tone between the third and fourth ; and upon going on as 

the original scale we shall find the same order preserved. 



ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 

Ex. 8 



P 



:(?« i_ 



s a 

TO CO 

The same is true, if we start from any other letter. The rule being: Insert as many accidentals as are 
necessary to make the order of tones and semi-tones the same as in the original key. The note from 
which any scale 6tarts is called the key-note, and any piece is said to be in the key named after the key- 
note of the 6cale in which it is written. (The key of C is also called the Natural key, from its having 
no sharps or flats.) For convenience 6ake, however, instead of inserting these accidentals whenever the 
proper notes occur, these signs are placed at the commencement of the piece, are called the Signature, 
and indicate that all notes on the degree of the staff upon which they are placed are to be influenced by 
the accidentals just the same as if they stood immediately before each note. 

Thus in the following example : 

Ex. 9. 





) ft 


p 










r* 




i ft 








n 








i rm ' 1 


KM; 1 ' 



Both F's are of course sharped. And so in general. 

Noticing in the examples already given, that G, the key of one £, is a, fifth above C, if we ascend a fifth 
from G, we come to D, the key of two sharps, the second sharp being again inserted before the new 
seventh. 

Ex. 10. 



• 



^ 



#= 



10 



ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 



Hence in general, by rising a fifth from each new key-note, and adding a sharped seventh to the signa- 
ture already employed, we come to the next higher scale in the Circle of Harmony. But this would 
involve unnecessary inconveniences, so that half of the scales only are treated generally as sharp scales, 
the other half being expressed in fiats. This has been already implied in Ex. 7 ; hence by ascending a 
fourth, a.nd flatting the fourth of the new scale, we progress in a corresponding manner, in flats. 



Ex. 11. 



Key of C 




Key of F. 



Key of Bj,. 



Key of Ej,. 



Key of Aj,. 



Key of D\). 



Key of %. 



It will be noticed that ascending a fifth, is equivalent to descending a fourth, and ascending a fourth to 
descending a fifth. 

§ 2. Transposition of the Minor Scale. 

Here the same principles operate as in the transposition of the Major Scale, the requisite being to 
preserve the order of the intervals. One other division of the Minor Scales must be noticed before we 
give the order of the key-notes. Every Major Scale has its corresponding, or relative, Minor Scale. The 
Natural key must have a relative minor key, where there is no signature. This is the key of A minor, 
the key-note of which is a minor-third below that of the Natural key, C. In general, to find the key-note 
of the relative Minor of any Major Scale, we descend a minor-third. But if we compare any Minor Scale 
' with the Major starting from the same key-note, we call it a Tonic Minor. It is a peculiarity of Minor 



ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 



11 



Scales that they always have Accidentals. Thus the relative Minor of C, is as in Ex. 4 and 5. The key- 
notes of the relative Minors in their consecutive arrangement are as follows : 

Ex. 12. 



4 



S ffi M 



* 



ite 



* 



A minor, rel. to C. E minor, rel. to G. B minor, rel. to D. F f minor, rel. to A. C $ minor, rel.to E. G J minor, rel.to B. 



ipi i^^ p^ in 



m 



D minor, rel. to F. G minor, rel. to B |j. C minor, rel. to E \>. F minor, rel. to Aj>. Bf> minor, rel. to D j>. E •> minor, rel. to G |>. 



CHAPTER V. 

§ 1. Time. 

Music naturally falls into a measured flow. An ever recurring accent marks it off in equal divisions, 
and thus originates musical Time. It depends upon the length of these divisions, and the number of 
notes of a given kind which they contain. To the eye these divisions are indicated thus: 

Ex. 13. 



i 



The perpendicular lines are called Bars, and the spaces between them Measures. All measures in the 
same kind of time must be of equal length; that is, must contain the same number of notes of the same 
kind, or their equivalents, as is shown in Chap. I. § 1. — In order to indicate at once how many notes ot a 



12 ELEMENTS OF MUSIC, 

certain sort are required to fill each measure, fractional marks are placed immediately after the signa- 
ture. Thus 4 may stand at the beginning of a piece, and it would show that four quarter-notes, or their 

4 
equivalents in other notes or rests, must fill each measure. In all cases the Denominator shows the kind 

of notes which is the standard, and the numerator how many are used in each measure. 

Originally there are but two kinds of time, double and triple ; according as every alternate note, of the 
value of the standard, or one in every three, has an accent. This may be exemplified in words, as 
good ness, hap'pily. But general usage makes another division entitled quadruple time. The different 
species are the following : 

Double Time. it. (or z£), jt, ~Sl, ~&. 

Triple Time. £, 3:, it, ±. 

¥ 4- W -8- 

Quadruple Time, 4 4 (or r?), iiL ~f~^~. 

* 4 fc -8 ^ 

Some aid to keeping correct time may be found by beating with the hand ; in double time there be. 

ing two beats, one down (accented), one up (unaccented). In Triple time there are three beats, one 

down (accented), one left (unaccented), one up (unaccented). In quadruple time there are four beate, 

one down (accented,), one left (unaccented), one right (accented), one up (unaccented). Regard to the 

accent is fully as important as to the number of beats in a measure. 

it, :fr, dhJL, ~j~2-, may have peculiar modes of beating, but it is simpler to classify them as above, — 

giving three quarter-notes in :&, three eight-notes in £, 4-2- . zfc2j, to each beat. At the same time it 

4 "S - "8" 1 

must be borne in mind that these groups of three quarters, or three eighth notes, have their subordinate 

accents as in triple measure. 

§ 2. Further Signs and Expressions. 
Two notes on the same degree of the staff may be held together and sung as one by means of the Tie 



ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 



13 



The same mark connecting notes on different degrees is called a Slur. 

Ex. 14. 

Slur. Tie. 

I ]ih m 



• d 



X-J-U- 



Three notes are sometimes required to be sung in the time of two, and six in the time of four. These 
are called Triplets, and Sextolets, and are thus expressed : 

Ex. 15. 



— d f \-0 a — \* — * — *—* — * — *-\—* 000- 



Equal to 



Equal to 



A double bar is used at the end of tunes and strains thus 



The sign to repeat is four dots, 



thus 



il 



CHAPTER VI. 

General Remarks. 

Music is a language ; and just as in speaking, if we fail to emphasize the important words and syllables, 
and to give true expression to the meaning we wish to convey, either we are misunderstood, or the value 
of what we say is lost— so in Music. After understanding all the characters employed, and being able to 
read any piece of music, if we fail to bring out the real meaning, half its value is lost. But in order to do 
this, several things are neccessary. We want first of all to understand what we are going to sing, see what is 



J4 



ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 



important in it, and endeavor to put ourselves in the spirit of it. This is indispensable, even to the wish 
to sing well, and the more perfectly this is done, the greater will be our success. Further, we must be very 
careful in our utterance of the sounds, that they be clear and pure, and on exactly the right pitch ; and 
in our utterance of the words, that they be distinctly articulated and clearly and accurately pronounced. 
Too much care can not be expended in just this direction. The management of the breath is also of ex- 
ceeding importance. The breath should be economized as much as possible. 

In conclusion, in sacred music, which is the highest of all, let it always be remembered that it is an 
act of praise and devotion, and let us endeavor to make melody in our hearts as well as with our voice? 



Musical Terms. 

Besides the general characteristics already given, — each piece has a character of its own, indicated 
plainly by such words as lively, tolemn, &c, — or by words taken from the Italian language. The princi- 
ple are the following : 



ADAGIO.— Very slow. 

LARGO.— Slow 

LARGHETTO — Less slow. 

MODERATO.— Moderately. 

ANDANTE .—Slow and gently. 

ANDANTINO. — Gently, and not quite so slow. 

ALLEGRETTO— Rather quick. 

ALLEGRO.— Quick. 

VIVACE.— With spirit. 

PRESTO.— Very quick. 

PRESTISSIMO.— As quick as possible. 

Occasional terms are : 
ACCELLERANDO.— Quicker. 
RALLENTANDO. ) „ - „ . .. ,. 

RITARD S fjradua <^V P r °l° n a M« titn*. 

Other terms are : 
AD LIBITUM.— At pleasure. 
AFFETUOSO.— Tenderly. 
A TEMPO.— In time 



BIS.— Twice. 

CANT ABIL,E.— Gracefully. 

DA CAPO, (D. C.) —Repeat from the beginning. 

FINE.— End. 

LEGATO.— Smooth and connected. 

MAESTOSO.— Majesticalhj. 

SOLI. — Single voices. 

SOSTENUTO. —Sustained. 

SOTTO VOCE.— With subdued voice. 

TUTTI— All together, full chorus. 

PIANO, (p.)— Soft. 

PIANISSIMO, (pp.)— Very soft. 

FORTE, (f.)—Loud. 

FORTISSIMO, (ff. )— Very loud. 

MEZZO PIANO, (mp.)— Rather soft. 

MEZZO FORTE, (mf)— Rather loud. 

CRESCENDO, (cres. or -"< ). — Increase volume of sound. 

DIMINUENDO, (dim. or :5 "~).— Diminish volume of sound 

SWP>LL, (- x=> ~). — Increase and diminish. 

SFORZANDO, (sfor. >).— Explosive. 

STACCATO. (• • or f f ).— Short and distinct 



HAPPY HOURS. 



Words by E. R. SILL. 



HAPPY HOURS. 



H. K. 



m 






& 



1. Happy hours ! as they wing, Let 



us sing, Till our glad voices 



£ 



f , J ;■ / / 



ring; Day or night, Dark or bright, 



§#§ 



m 



m 



& 



5=F 



— s — »— tf*- 1 -*-.-* ■ — — r J ^ ^i-y ■ * g »-^ 



Hap - py, hap - py hours ! 



Song is joy and de - light. 



:£ 



Hap - py, hap - py hours ! 



f^F 






^ 






I 



2 Happy hours ! every clime, 

Every time, 
Has its musical chime; 

Morn and noon, 

La4re and soon, 
Every season its tune — 

Happy, happy hours ! 



Happy hours ! all the year 

They appear, 
If sweet music is near; 

Hymns we raise 

To His praise 
Who bestows on our days, 

Happy, happy hours 1 



4 Happy hours ! when at last 

O'er the past 
Mem'ry's glances are cast; 

They will seem 

Like a dream, 
As so brightly they gleam, 

Happy, happy hours 1 



16 



GO AHEAD. 













S m P 


r s 1 


r ft h 


A 


A. 0. 

h ! 


V i '■* '} 






' P J 


p m # 


* ^ N 




JL. h *• t. ^ 1 


-v n _L 


p • 


J *i 






- ' |> | |— 


(fa? 4- fi_ 


-J — J-^ 


— P- 


— # — 


— /t a 


— i — J— 


1 — 2 — J — J — 


313 3 — J^ 


0- 


1. Go 

2. Go 

3. Go 

4. Go 


-i — i- 

a - head, 
a - head, 
a - head, 
a - head, 

* * 


1 — m— 
■* 
go 

g° 

go 
go 


— « * — 

a - head, 
a - head, 
a - head, 
a - head, 

-f f— 


i_j — • — = — ._, 

If your cause is 
Tho' the heart be 
All the world is 
With a song of 

. * * £ 

i — ' 1 — — i 1 


real - ly good 
wear - i -some, 
wak - ing up ; 
cheerful - ness 

•*- ^ s J 


; Don't be lag - ging 
Du - ty's path con - 
Ris - ing from his 

; Let Mie slug-gard 

A f *- F 


1 ; ' 

in the rear, 
tent - ed tread, 
down - y bed, 
be dismayed 

-f- P- * 


9 : '^f ' " 


f- 


y y 


— v » * » — 


-U V 1 


-v — i 


-y-> 


* — T~~ 


--^-b-4— f- 


~* — r — 


r£= 


-\? — 


-V * 1> e>- 




— - — - — # — •— 


-b 




t* 


• r 












i> i/ 











3— i -J 3 i 



3=^=*=? 



With the i - die mul - ti - tude. Cast a - side the love of ease, Ev - 
Wheth-er bright or drear -i - some. See the migh -ty harvest waves, Go, 
Sloth his cross is tak - ing up. Justice rules, and at his word Cru - 
By the des - ert's fearful -ness. Tempters and temptations face With 



ry - thing en - cumber - ing, 
put on the reaper's dress, 
el wrongs are fly - ing fast, 
a brave te - mer - i - ty, 




Gold - en moments glad - ly seize, Nev - er think of slumber- ing. 
Gath - er in the gold-en sheaves, With a no - ble earnest-ness. 
Pierc'd by truth's a - venging sword, Hoar- y er - ror's dy - ing fast. 
Thro' the storm and sunshine press On - ward with eel - er - i - Ay. 



Go a - head, go a - head, 






m^m 



f—T-f- 0- 



i — i- 



% 



GO AHEAD. Concluded. 



17 




La - bor for hu - man - i - ty ; Life's the time for earnest toil, Spend it not in varn - i - ty. 

i , ' , — rr u -u — u u - l . i » — .* — -<> * *- 



sa3^? 



n 



•- 



3t=t 



Itto 



KEEP ON TRYING. 



i, i • ' -#■ * i. 



3=2 



A. A. G. 



M 



-±~~ 



-»— *-#- 



1. Are your lessons hard and long, What's the use of sighing? With a re - solution strong, Keep on trying. 

2. Does an e - vil hab - it reign, All your powers defying ? Fight it o'er and o'er again, Keep on trying. 

3. Should the voice of duty call, Cheerfully complying, Bravely break the sluggard's thrall, Keep on trying. 






t 



3T^ 



£ 



£ 



i 



£g 



: R g= ? = 



p— p= 



1^_1V_>L 







Cease your sighing, sighing, sighing, Keep on trying, trying, trying 

You can conquer if you will ; Keep on trying still. 



S 



15 



-iT 1 ? 



w w r * 



'—/—^ — /— w-i 



R=£ 



X 



£=£ 



4 Should the thorns your path bestrew, 
Do not think of flying ; 
Step by step your way pursue, 
Keep on trying. Cho. 



P=t=t 



*=?=£=?= 



rrrr 



V— ^— /t 



t= ± 5=r 



££ 



5 Bravely dare and nobly do, 
Sin and self denying ; 
With the great, and good, and true, 
Keep on trying. Che. 



m 




ON WARD, AND UPWARD. 






& 






. 0- 



1— < 



£=£ 



1—2-3; 



v 

1. Let us not look for a path ev - er flow-ery, Let us not sigh when we're pierc'd by the thorn ; 

2. Tho' we may walk by the sunshine attend - ed, Clouds and thick darkness may brood o'er us now ; 

3. Let us be patient, and learn self de -ni - al, Suf - fer we must, if a - bove we would reign ; 

4. Nev - er, then, faint in the pathway of du - ty, Sing in the storm, as when skies are se - rene ; 

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Let us not long for a sky 
But when the pil - grim his jour 
Faith, hope and love will endure 
Cheer'd by the smile of the King 

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nev - er low - ery, 

-ney has end -ed, 

the stern tri - al, 

in his beau - ty, 



Let us not weep when we're weary and worn. 
Sunshine e - ter - nal shall cir - cle his brow. 
If on the arm of the Loved One we lean. 
Warm'd by the rays from the glo - ry un - seen. 



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ONWARD, AND UPWARD. Concluded. 

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Lured by temptation, en - compassed by danger, Home of the blest we are pressing to thee. 
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1. See the riv - ers flowing Downward to the sea, Pour-ing all their treasures, Bounti-ful and free ; 

2. Watch the princely flowers Their rich fragrance spread, Load the air with perfumes, From their beauty shed: 

3. Give thy heart's best treasures, From fair nature learn; Give thy love — and ask not, Wait not for re-turn ! 

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See, to help their giving, Hidden springs a-rise ; Or, if need be, showers Feed them from the skies ! 
Yet their lavish spending Leaves them not in dearth, With fresh life replenished By their moth-er earth ! 
And the more thou spendest From thy lit-tle store, With a double bounty, God will give thee more. 






20 ttofd. by E. K. SILL. 



STUDENT'S LAY. (It's a way we haye.) 



ArraDged. 



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1. We think it is the rule, sir, To hate to be a fool, sir, And so we come to school, sir, To drive drill care away, 

2. There's many a man so sad, sir, Because his heart is bad, sir, He never can be glad, sir, To drive dull care away, 

3. There was a man of France, sir, Who only knew how to dance, sir, And that gave little chance, sir, To drive, &c. 



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school, sir, It's a way we have at school, sir, It's a way we have at school, sir, To dri 



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way we have at school, sir, It's a way we have at school, sir, It's a way we have at school, 

D. C. al :Fb CODA for last verse. 



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To drive dull care a - way. To drive dull care a-way. It's a 




So say we all of us, So say we 
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6 The meanest man of all, sir, 

Was one who lived in Gaul, sir, 

He would'nt learn to read, write, or 'rithmetic, and so 
did'at kuow much of anything at all, sir. To drive, &c. 



4 There was a man of Spain, sir, 
Who had too little brains, sir, 
To go in when it rained, sir, 

To drive dull care away, &c. 

5 There was a lazy Turk, sir, 

Who all his tasks would shirk, sir, 
So had no honest work, sir, 
To drive dull care away, &c. 



7 But we propose to know, sir, 

And to the school we go, sir, 

To put some ideas into our noddle*, af id make ourselves 
good useful American citizens from head to toe, sir.To.&c 



WHAT'S THE USE? 



A. A. 0. 



21 



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1. Por-ing o'er the lettered pages, Hour by hour, and day by day, Like a set of gloomy sages; 
2. Though in wisdom you are lacking, While you're youthful pray be gay ; Why should you your brains be racking ? 

3. Now, when all around is smiling, Leave your books for sportive play; Why should you in school be toiling ? 

4. Leave your studies till you're older, Pleasure's winning voice o - bey; Wait not till the heart is colder, 

5. What's the use of school or college? While you're young enjoy, I say; All that study yields is knowledge, 






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CHORUS. 






What's the use I pray? What's the use ? What's the use? Surely you must be 
What's the use I pray? What's the use? &c. 
What's the use I pray? What's the use? &c. 
What's the use I pray? What's the use? &c. 
What's the use I pray? What's the use? <fcc. 

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a goose; Don't you see we're 



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heaping treasure, Better far than gold or pleasure : Schoolmates dear, Never fear, Wealth shall be ours Without mea 






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STEP BY STEP. 



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uot to the sluggard who tells us 'tis vain With knowledge the mind to en - cumber, Who 
tera - pie of knowledge! how glorious it stands, Press on with the zeal of the youthful ; For 



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looks on the children of toil with disdain, And yields to the spirit of slumber. 
" learning is bet - ter than houses or lands, "And surely the adage is truthful. 



Step by step, keep 




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climbing up the hill, Upward, still upward be 



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3 The wealth of the mind ! O its worth is untold, 

The power that it yields who can measure? 
Then gather it up as a miser his gold, 

And add every da)' to your treasure. Clio. 

4 The hill may be steep, and the feet may be sore, 

But this should your courage awaken. — 

Yoii're nearer the summit than ever before, 

For many a step have you taken. Cho. 



BE KIND TO ONE 




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ANOTHER. 




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1. As o'er the lettered page yon bend, Be prompt to aid each oth - er, And when the toil 

2. If an- ger in your heart should burn, Then haste the fire to smother; And nev-er ill 

3. When joy lights up the youthful eye, And pleasures chase each oth- er, 



some 
for 
Don't dim with frowns a 



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ill re-turn, Be kind to one 
sun - ny sky, Be kind to one 



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an - oth - er. Thus schoolmates ev - 
an - oth - er. Thus schoolmates, &c. 
an - oth-er. Thus schoolmates, &c. 

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live and love, As 



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sister and as brother, And like 



the an - gel band a - bove, Be kind to one an - other. 



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If bleeding hearts your aid demand, 

Be like a tender mother; 
Bind up the wound with gentle hand, 

B/> kind to one another. Cho. 



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The hour draws nigh when you must 
Then while you're with each other; 

This motto write upon your heart. 
"Be kind to one another." 



part, 



24 MAKE THE HOME HAPPY. *. a g. 

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1. The world yields its riches and pleasures, But oft the possess - or of both, Will turn from his joys and his 

2. Be kind to the flock, never wound them, To parents be loving and true; And cling like an i - vy a - 

3. When grief robs the eye of its brightness, Be ready to share in the pain, And when the heart leaps in its 



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treasures, And sigh for the home of his youth. Then, make thehome happy dear children, The home of the father 
round them, As fondly as they cling to you. [and 

lightness, Rejoice that 'tis sunshine again. 



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mother ; Then make the home happy dear children, The home of the sis - ter and brother. 

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4 Let love guide the words that are spoken, 
And love crown with lustre the deed, 
Let love be the girdle unbroken, 
That bkids you in sunshine and shade. 



Cho. 



5 While others will boldly disown her, 
Let Piety dwell 'neath your dome, 
And in the dear circle enthrone her, 
The fairest adornment of home. Cho. 



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1. O nev - er respond, "I have nothing to give" 

2. When writhing in anguish and pierced by the dart, 



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yours in a re - gion of trouble to live, Where sorrows abound and af - flictions bereave, And 
say to the children of sorrow, "Depart," Who tirn - id - ly knock at the door of your heart, Be 



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The Friend of the poor will re - pay . 
And lighten the burden of grief. 



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4 The youngest ami poorest have something to spare. 

Whose value can never he told ; 
Ah yes, for the language of kindness will cheer, 
There's power in a word, in a sigh, in a tear, 
And blessings are granted in answer to prayer 

More precious than sdver or aoldL 



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3 Look out on the world, see the harvests to reap, 
The famishing multitude see ; 
Shall thousands in carnal security sleep, 
Shall Satan his vassals in servitude keep. 
And few be the reapers who labor and weep, 
And "nothing to give" be our plea? 



MAKE THE WORLD BETTER. 



26 MAKE THE WORI 



A. A. G. 



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1. Ev - er be toil-ing to make the world bet-ter, Live not for rich-es, nor pleasures, nor fame; 

2. Voi - ces ten thousand from country and ci - ty Mournful- ly strike on the list - en - ing ear; 

3. Ten - der-ly bind up the heart that is bleeding, Ten - der -ly dry up the fountain of grief; 

4. Few are the la - bor-ers sow- ing and reap -ing. Pant - ing they wait for the need-ed re -lief; 
6. But there's a rest for the way-worn and wea - ry, When the brief season of toil-ing is o'er; 



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Op - en the pri- son, and loos-en the fet - ter, 
Keep the heart warm, and the empire of pi - ty, 
Pa - tiently list - en to pov-er-ty's pleading, 
Go forth and sow, though you scatter with weeping, 
Rest in a land nev - er darksome and drea-ry, 



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Res-cue the victims of fol - ly and shame. 
Ev - er be read- y to help and to cheer. 
Cheerful-ly give to the need-y re - lief. 
Joy shall be yours when you gather the sheaf. 
Rest on e - ter - ni - ty's ev - ergreen shore. 

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Life is too short to be wasted in 



van - i - ty, Gird on your ar-mor and en - ter the field; 






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MAKE THE WORLD BETTER. Concluded. 

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Work for tlie welfare of wretched lru- man - i - ty, God is thy helper, and God is thy shield. 



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HUNTING SONG. 



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1. While the beams of sunrise Up the East appear, Through the crisp air ringing, Hark ! the bugle clear. 

2. Larks that ca- rol upward, Scatter flute-notes here, Fountain-like to meet them, Wakes the bugle clear. 

3. Quick, in-to the saddle ! Mount ! while far and near, Thro' the keen air breaking — Hark! the bugle clear. 

4. Down the dew-y valleys, O'er the uplands near, Follow the shrill echoes — Hark! the bu-gle clear. 

5. Ho ! the air so sparkling, Ho ! the life so dear ! Hark ! the sweet wild music — 'Tis the bu-gle clear. 



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La, la, la ! La, la, la ! La, la, la ! . 



'Tis the sil - ver bu - crle clear. 



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Words by CLARA F. BERRY. 
With varied expression. 



DON'T LEAVE THE FARM. 



H. KINGSBURY. 



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1. Come, boys, I have something to tell you, Come near, I would whisper it low- You're thinking of leaving the 

2. You talk of the mines of Australia, They're wealthy in gold, without doubt, But ah ! there is gold on the 




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homestead, Don't be in a hur - ry to go. 

farm, boys, If on - ly you'll shov-el it out. 

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The ci - ty has ma - ny at - tractions, But 
The mer - cantile life is a haz - ard, The 



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think of the vices and sins, When once in the vortex of fashion, How soon the course downward begins, 
goods are first high and then low, Bet -ter risk the old farm awhile longer, Don't be in a hurry to go^ 



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DON'T LEAVE THE FARM. Concluded. 



CHORUS. 



29 



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Don't be in a hur - ry to go, boys, Don't be in a bur - ry to go ; Don't 



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be in a bur - ry, Don't be in a bur - ry, Don't be in a hur - ry to go ! 



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The great busy West has inducements, 

And so has the busiest mart, 
But wealth is not made in a day, boy.s, 

Dnn' t be in a hum/ tn start ! 
The bankers and brokers are wealthy, 

They take in their thousands or so, 
Ah ! think of the frauds and deceptions 

Don't be in a hurry to go ! 



4. 

The farm is the safest and surest, 

The orchards are loaded to-day, 
You're free as the air of the mountains, 

And monarch of all you survey. 
Better stay on the farm a while longer, 

Though profits come in rather slow, 
Remember you've nothing to risk, boys. 

Don't be in a hurry to so ! 




WHEN WE ARE TWENTY-ONE. 



A. A. 6. 

From " Happy Voices," by periniiiion 

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1. When we 

2. There is 



are twen- ty - one, boys, When we are twenty - one, We cast the fetters off, boys, Our 
a ru - by cup, boys, 'Tis held in Pleasure's hand, We'll quaff it long and deep, boys, A 



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pu - pil-age is done; Be -fore us is the world, boys, We'll try what it can do; It prom-is- es so 
hap-py, jo- vial band ; And treasure we'll secure, boys, And honor'ssteep we'll climb, And sober tho'ts we'll 




fair, boys, We'll prove it false or true; It prom-is -es so fair, boys. We'll prove it false or true. 
i.ve, boys, To those who've pass'd their prime; And sober tho'ts we'll leave,boys, To those who've pass'd their prime. 



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3 But hark ! I hear a voice, boys ; 

It whispers, "Youth, beware ! 
Before you're twenty-one, boys, 

The dream may disappear — 
The blooming cheek grow pale, boys, 

And dim the sparkling eye, 
||: And in death's cold embrace, boys, 

The active form may lie. :|| 



& "Talk not of twenty-one, boys, 

Talk not of twenty-one; 
The present now is all, boys. 

That you can call your own; 
Each moment as it glides, boys, 

Its hidden store reveals; 
|| : But who can pierce the veil, boys 

Which future years conceals? :|| 



5 " 'Twere madness then to sing, boys, 

And boast of years to come; 
Awake from folly's dream, boys, 

The Saviour calls you home; 
Now while the harvest waves, boys, 

The reaper's garb put on, 
|| And gather sheaves for heav'n, boys, 

Before you're twenty-one." :|j 



SIGN THE PLEDGE. 



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A. A. G. 



31 






1. Sign the pledge, sign the pledge, Ey'ry son and daughter, Come, renounce the deadly cup. Drink the crystal wa - ter ; 

2. Who hath woe, who hath woe, Who hath wounds and sorrow? Who for sensual joy to day , Keaps remorse to morrow ? 



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Tis the drink, 'tis the drink, That our Father gave us, Health and wealth itne'er destroys, And never will enslave us. 
Who hath want, who hath want. Who hath sh ,/neaud sadness?Those who tarry at the wine, And mix the cup of madness. 



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Pure cold water, pure cold water, Pure cold water is the drink for me, Pure cold water, pure cold water. 



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Pure cold wa - tei 



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3 Sign the pledge, sign the pledge, 

Every man and woman, 
This will cheer your brother man, 

Struggling with the foeman : 
Loving words, gentle word3, 

Make the heart grow stronger ; 
He may be redeemed, and wear 

The galling chain no longer. Cho. 



32 



"A FARMER I WILL BE." (A Song for Boys.) 



May be sung as a Solo 
Quick and Spirited. 



From BRADBURY'S " Carol " by permission. 



p- 1 *—* — 9 — 3 L * — #— * — b* — ■ — t? — P — u — i , r-~0~^ — * — * — 3~; i — * — ^ 



P 

1. I am a hale and hear-ty boy, As one would wish to see, And of - ten, though a lit - tie chap, I 

2. All scenes of nature I admire, None else so smiling seem, The sha- dy nook, the flowery grove, And 

3. I love to look at pleasant fields, I love the balmy breeze, I love to hear the lit - tie birds, All. 

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think, "What shall I be?" Me-chan-ic, merchant, sai-lor — Ah, none of these for me ! If ev - er I should 

lit - tie silver stream; But those who lead a city life, These beauties seldom see; If ev - er, &c. 

warbling in the trees, And those who live a country Life, Such things as these may see; If ev - er, &c. 

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CHORUS. 



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■ If ev - er I should be a man, A farm-er, a 

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farm-er, a farmer I will be, A 



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A FARMER I WILL BE. Concluded. 







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farmer I will be. 






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Words by PIJRCIVAL. 



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4. 1 love to furrow up the ground, 

And cultivate the soil, 
I love to see it springing forth, 

The good and luscious spoil; 
For fields of wheat and cc-rn, indeed, 

I dearly love to see; 
If ever I should be a man, &c. 



5. I would not be a doctor, 
The sick to cure or kill; 

I would not be a lawyer, no! 
To take against my will; 

I may not be a preacher, 
Tho' I like him of the three, 

If ever I should be a man, &c. 



SITTING BY A MEADOW BROOK. 




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1. Sitting by a meadow brook, In the month of June, Once a short repose I took, Just at sunny noon 

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Blossoms, many-tinted, shone 
O'er the meadow far; 

But one blossom stood alone, 
'Along them all a star. 



3. 

Once it seemed a full blown rose; 

Golden lily then; 
Wreaths of snow-drops now unclose; 

Blooms the rose again. 



Who can tell the wondrous flower, - 
Flower that reigns alone ? 

He who beauty's magic power 
O'er the heart has known. 



34 Words by PERCIVAL. 

Sparkling. 



SKATING. 



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1. We speed o'er the star-lighted mirror along, And the wood and the mountain re-e -cho our song; As 



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on, like the wing of the ea - gle we sweep, Now gliding, now wheeling, we ring o'er the deep. The 



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winds whistle keenlv, — the red cheek is warm, And there's none who would yield not his breast to the storm. 

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2 Tl e stars are above us, so full and so bright, 

And the mirror below us is gemmed with their light; 
Like the far- wheeling hawk, in the mid-air we fly, — 
A sky is above us, — below us a sky. 
as onward we glide in our race we keep time, 
And clear as the morninf boll echoes our ohime. 



3 By pine-covered rock, and by willow-bound shore, 
Breast even with breast, like a torrent we pour; 
Short, quick are our strokes, as we haste to the mark 
And shrill is our cry, as the trill of the lark, 
The goal is now reached, and we bend us away, 
Wide wheeling, or curving in fanciful play. 



SONG OF THE SKATEJRS. 



A. A. G. 



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1. O'er the ice - bound lake we fly, Swift as the wind and free; While the old woods ring as we 

2. Youthful bloom, and manhood's prime Join in the healthful race; And the maiden comes with her 

3. Eis - ing now, the full orbed moon Looks on the gladsome scene; And the ice-bound lake, and the 



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pass them by With the shout and the song of glee, 
grace - ful form, And the smile of her win - some face. 
snow-clad hill Are arraved in her sil - ver sheen. 



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What care we for the driving snow ? 
What care we for the wordling's thrall ? 
What care we for the drowsv head? 



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hat care we tho' the chill winds blow ? What care we tho' the sun sinks low ? Fearless and hale are we. 
hat care we for the banquet hall ? What care we for the midnight ball ? Joys that are brief and base, 
hat care we for the down-y bed ? What care we tho' the daylight's fled? On with the race a - gain. 



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36 Words by E. R. SILL. 

Sparkling. 



SLEIGHRIBE SONG. 



Arranged. 




Echo. 



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the night is 
the fire and 
From the rock and 
And the din of 



so cold, 'tis clear as a bell, Clear as a bell, And the stars are sparkling keen, j 

the lamp we shout farewell, Shout farewell, And the nodding heads between. \ 

the hill falls ech - o clear, Ech - o clear, As we dash o'er the moonlit track, ) 

the bells sounds far and near, Far and near, From the i - cy cliff flung back, j 



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Tis a night to 
Like a bird we 



hold the tightened reins, And to spin the fields a - long, And to 
skim the froz - en snow, With a speed as swift and free, Hear the 



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an-swer the peal 
bells, how tkey ring 



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of the danc - ing bells, Dancing bells, With a mer - ry shout and song. 
-"cling-a-ling, cling-a-ling," "Ling, cling-a-ling," With a frosty mel-o - dv. 



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SLEIGHRIDE. Concluded. 



37 



8 All tbe air Is calm as a frozen lake, Frozen lake, 
And the earth is hushed below, 
And the pure, silver starlight, as it falls, As it falls, 

Seems to tinkle on the snow. 
With our flying hoofs the skaters race, 

As we skirt the river's brim, 
And they send us a cheer that the echoes chase, Echoes chase, 
As the glare blue ice they skim. 

BOAT SONG. 




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4 Then away like an arrow on its flight, On Its flight, 
'Neath the frosty sky so clear ; 
We will frighten the owls with ourjinglingbell*, Jingling bells, 

Till they hoot all night for fear. 
And the farmhouse sleepers in their beds, 
We'll awake with song and shout ; 
'Tis no time for sleep when the moon's so bright, Moon's so bright, 
And the sleighing bells are out. 

From the " Sunny Side Glbe Book," 
by permission of T. F. SEWARD. 

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1. Our boat is off, our boat is off, See how she floats the wave. As if on wing the fairy thing, Steers o'er the waters 









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briue; With laugh and songwe glide along Up-on the rippling sea, All fa-ces bright with pure delight, Oh 

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who is so merry as we, as we, Oh, who is so merry as we. 
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2 We'll speed away thro' dashing spray, 

O'er waves of every hue, 
And bound along with current strong, 
Upon the waters blue. 
With laugh and song, &c. 

3 As safe are we, as proudly free, 

As birds that cleave the air; 
Our wings as white, as swift our 
As sea-gulls darting there. 
With laugh and song, dec. 



38 



THE FISHER HOY. 



Spirited. 



H. KINGSBURT. 



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1. Merri-ly oh ! nierri - ly oh ! The. nets are spread out to the sun ; Merri-ly oh ! the fisher-boy sings, Right 

2. Merri-ly oh ! merri - ly oh ! He sleeps till the morning breaks; Merrily oh ! at the sea-gull's scream, The 



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glad that his la - bor is done. Happy and gay, with his boat in the bay, The storm and the danger for- 
fish - er - boy quickly a - wakes. Down on the strand he is plying his hand.His shouting is heard a - 



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got ; The wealthy and great might repine at their state, And envy the fisher-boy's lot. Merri - ly oh ! 
gain; The clouds are dark, but he springs to his bark With the same light-hearted strain. Merri - ly oh ! 

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THE FISHER-BOY. Concluded. 



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mer - ri - ly oh ! This is the burden he gives; Cheer -i 
mer - ri - ly oh! This is the burden he gives; Cheer -i 



ly oh ! tho' the blast may blow, The 
ly oh ! tho' the blast may blow, The 



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fish - er • 
fish - er ■ 



boy jol - li - ly lives. Jol - li- ly, jol - li - ly, jol - li • 
boy jol - li - ly lives. Jol - li- ly, &c. 



ly, jol - li - ly, jol - li - ly, jol - li - ly, 



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jol - li - ly, jol - li - 1}', jol - li - ly lives, The fish - er - boy jol - li - ly lives. 



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40 Worflaby PERCIVAL. 
1st and 2d tenors. 
Spirited. 



SONG OF THE HUNTERS. (For male voices.) 



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1. O, see how the red deer boundeth, As he hears the horn in the morning! He leaps, as the 

2. And on, thro' the for - est fieet-ing, He hies to the rock-built fountain, And hears but the 



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blast re - soundeth, In his flight the hun -ter scorning. And a - way, a - way, oh, away, 
e - cho retreating, To the dells and glens of the mountain. He stands by the wel - come spring, 



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He fleets thro' the for - est drear, It is more wild freedom's play, Than the hurried speed of fear. 
And looks in the mirror below, When hark! thro' the greenwood ring, The horn and the loud oho! 



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He leaps, as the blast resoundeth, 



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In his flight the hnn - ter scorning; And a . way, a - 
In his flight the hnn - ter scorning; And a - way, a - 

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As he hears the horn in the morning. Then o - ho ! o 

As he hears the horn in the morning. Then o - ho ! o 



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a - way to chase the deer. 

the [Omit .] free, the free are here. 



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ho ! o - ho ! o - ho ! o - ho ! Then o - ho ! o - ho ! a - way to chase the deer. 



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42 




Lively. 



THE HUNTER'S HORN. t.f.seward. 

From the " ScNNYgiDS Glee Book," by permission. 



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1. The mel - low notes of the hunter's horn Over the hills sound clear, Its tones are on the 

2. Pursued with speed by his urg - ing foes, The deer now swiftly bounds : The hunter's heart with 

3. The deer now mounts o'er the hill so high, The horn sounds far be-low; Our steeds now o'er the 



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breezes borne, And the cry of the hounds I hear ! Hark ! hark ! hark ! 
pleasure glows.While the horn in the distance sounds. Hark! <fce. 
turf do fly, With rner-ri-est bound they go. Hark! &c, 







/a imitation of horns. 



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THE HUNTER'S HORN. Concluded. 



43 



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la, la, la, la, la, la, la... 



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Words by E. R. SILL. 
IVi/A visor. 



HELP IT ON. 




Arr. from a popular Student's Song 



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1. There's a good time coming, Help it on ! 

2. There's a future on the way, Help it on ! 

3. When you find a noble cause, Help it on ! 

4. And when the right shall win, Help it on ! 



There's a good time coming, Help it on ! 
There's a future on the way, Help it on ! 
When you find a noble cause, Help it on ! 
And when the right shall win, Help it on ! 



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When the 

Never 
There will 



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J Help it on, help it ou ! 



Help it on, Help it on 



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on, on, on! 
on, on, on! 
on, on, on! 
on, on, on! 



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heart its tune is drumming, All the air with it is humming, Help it 
night shall turn to day, For the right shall have the'way, Help it 
wait for man's applause, Nev-er count the cost, nor pause, Help it 
be no want nor sin, And the good time shall be - gin. Help it 

— JL 



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on, Help it on, 

on, Help it on, 

on, Help it on. 

on, Help it on. 



Help it 
Help it 
Help it 
Help it 



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A CALL TO LABOR. 



a. A. a. 



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1. Sun,rnoon and stars on their watch-towers are shining, Bless- 

2. Life is too brief to be wast- ed in sleep-ing, Seize 

3. Wake then to du - ty, and cheer-ful - ly la - bor, Take 



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ing the world with their beauty and 
the sharp sick- le and en - tesr the 
for thy mod- el the Mas-ter di - 
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Na - ture a- round us thinks not of re -pin -ing, Brave- 
There the great harvest is ripe for the reap-ing, Read • 
Where there's hu-nian - i - ty there is thy neighbor, Tho' 



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ly she toils thro' the day and the night : 
y the treasures im-mor-tal to yield, 
in a dungeon that neighbor may pine. 







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All things a- round us, be - neath us, a - bove us, Stern- ly re- buke the dull sluggard 
Sloth may look down with contempt on the toil - er, What car - eth . he for the sneer and 
Nev - er think use-less the child-ish eji-deav- or, Might-y re- suits from a word oft- 



and drone, 

the scorn ? 

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A CALL TO LABOR. Concluded. 



45 



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then a spir - it of dil - i-gence move us, Wheth-er a child or a king on his throne. 
- pi - er far than his sluggish re - vil - er, Still he keeps toil-ing tho' wea -ry and worn, 
the pure vol-ume of truth for thy le - ver, Earth shalt thou raise from its darkness and woe. 

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Words by LONGFELLOW. 



SOMETHING LEFT UNDONE. 



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1. La - bor with what zeal we will, Something still re - mains un- done, Something un - com- 

2. By the bed - side, on the stair, At the threshold, near the gates, With its men - ace 

3. Waits, and will not go a - way ; Waits, and will not be gainsay ed ; By the cares of 




plet - ed still Waits the ris - ing of the sun. 
or its prayer, Like a men - di - cant it waits ; 
yes - ter - day, Each to - day is heav - ier made 



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Till at length the burden seems 
Greater than our strength can bear, 

Heavy as the weight of drearns 
Pressing on us everywhere. 

And we stand from day to day, 
Like the dwarfs of time gone by, 

Who, as Northern legends say, 
On their shoulders held the sky, 



46 



THE WORKERS. 



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From the '■ Sonny Side Glee Book," 
by permission of T. F. SEWARD. 



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1, Clink, clank, go the hammers now, The stur-dy anvils ring; Clink, clank, go the hammers now, The 

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The bel-lows roar, and the hot flames pour Their rud-dy light far 



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o - ver the floor, The bel-lows roar, and the hot flames pour. And the brawny smiths they sing. 



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|| : Whir-r-r-r go the busy looms, 
In the factories dark and high; :|| 

Where the tinted sunbeam softly falls. 

Through the crusted panes on the black 
ened walls, 

Where the tinted sunbeam softly falls, 
yrom the pure and lovely «ky. 



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3 ||. On, on speed the sharpened plows. 
As they turn the heavy soil ; :|| 
Where the sturdy farmer guides the share 
Through the last year's furrows, gleam- 
ing bare 



||: These, these are the workers brave, 

With hearts so strong and true ; :j| 
From dawn till dark, through the whole 
day's length. 
Each gives with an earnest will his strength, 



Where the sturdy farmer guides the share From dawn till dark, through the whole 
With the honest hand of toil. day's length. 

To the work he finds to do 



Words by MlSS A. A. PROCTER. 

Vigorous. , «- 



NOW! 



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1. Rise ! for the day is passing, And you lie dreaming on ; The others have buckled their armor, And 



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forth to the fight have gone. A place in the ranks awaits you, Each man has some part to play : The 

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2 Rise from your dreams of the Future, - 
Of gaining some hard-fought field, 
Of storming some airy fortress, 
Or bidding some giant yield ; 
Your Future has deeds of glory, 
Of honor (God grant it may '.) 
But your arm will never he stronger, 
Or the need so great us Today. 



3 Rise ! if the Past detains you, 

Her sunshine and storms forget ; 
No chains so unworthy to hold you 

As those of a vain regret ; 
Sad or bright, she is lifeless ever, 

Cast her phantom arms away, 
Nor look hack, save to learn the lesson 

Of a nobler strife Today. 



4 Rise ! for the day is passing. 

The sound that you scarcely hear 
Is the enemy marching to battle : 

A rise ! for the foe is here ! 
Stay not to sharpen your weapons, 

Or the hour w ill strike at last, 
When, from dreams of a coming battle, 

You may wake to find it past! 



LAUGHTER. 



a. a. a. 



W t — r*~ iN-ip-sh- ^ f » h J i -N ~ ^ f > h — r-T T -h K . 1 



v - • - I V 

• Laugh and grow fat " is a say-ing of old. Whether or not 'tis a cause of o - bes- i - ty; 

" Tic-kled to death " is an-oth-er wise saw, Do not be-lieveit, 'tis not a re - al - i - ty; 

Be not sus-pi-cious of in - no-cent mirth, Heart - i - ly join in the harmless hi - lar^ i-ty; 

Mirth should be timely, so do not be rash, Take laughing-gas, and proceed to ex - trem- i-ties; 









This I believe — that the phys - i - cal man Laughter demands as a kind of ne - ces - si - ty. 
Cheerfulness ev - er is health to the bones, Nursing our grief is the bane of vi - tal - i-ty. 
Let the heart leap in its gladness and glee, If you would have it the em- pire of char - i-ty. 
Laugh when 'tis fitting, — and let me just add, On-ly the good should indulge in such len - i-ties. 



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ba ! ha ! Make the home ring a - gain. Ha ! ha ! ha ! Make the home ring a - gain. 



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Ha ! ha ! ha ! Care will take wing a - gain, Laugh-ter will drive him a 

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Spirited 



SONS OF THE CHASE, AWAKE ! 



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1. Sons of the chase, a - wake ! Haste, see the morning break ! Wake to the horn ! Ere fades the 

2. Hark to the bay of hound, Tossed from the mountains 'round ! Hark to the horn ! Mount, -mount and 



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morning star, Echoes, round crag and scar, Proud-ly its blast a - far, — Far rings the horn! 
nark - a - way ! Bright dawns the glorious day, -Soon we'ye the stag at bay: Loud wind the bom ! 



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Words by E. R. SILL. 



AWAY, DULL CARE. 



H. K. 
From ■' Happy Voices," by periniasloF 







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1. There is beauty on the land, There is splendor on the sea, Full of glo-ry is the heaven, And the earth is full of 

2. Tho' the sunshine sometimes fails, And the clouds sometimes appear, Up beyond the clouds the sun Ever shines in radiance 

3. Ev- en night with all her shade, Ev- en winter with bis snow, Come in beauty to the earth, And in joy-ous music 







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glee: Every robin in the gTass, Every Iarkonsun-ny wing, Warbles loud a song of joy, And shall we not also sing? 

dear ; Tho' the daylight fades away In the shadows of the Even,'Tis that stars may shine and tell That the earth is hungin heaven ! 

go: Every snowflake is a gem, Sparkling to the sun a - far, And each shadow of the night Has a shining silver star. 



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Then lift the song on high, And fill the arching sky, Till every heart shall catch the strain, And ring the echo 



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AWAY, DULL CARE. Concluded. 



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back again: Goodbye, De - spair! Away, dull care! A - way, a- way, away, a 



way. 




Words by Miss PROCTER 



ONE BY ONE. 



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1. One by one the sands are flow-ing, One by one the moments fall; Some are com-ing, 

2. One by one thy du - ties wait thee, Let thy whole strength go to each, Let no fu - ture 

3. Ev - ery hour that fleets so slow - ly Has its task to do or bear; Lurn-i - nous the 

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some are go - ing; Do not strive to grasp them all. 
dreams e - late thee, Learn thou first what thesje can teach, 
crown, and ho - ly, When each gem is set with care. 

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4 Do not linger with regretting, 

Or for passing hours despond; 
Nor the daily toil forgetting, 
Look too eagerly beyond. 

5 Hours are golden links, God's token, 

Reaching heaven; but one by one 
Take them, lest the chain be broken 
Ere the pilgrimage be done. 



52 



Words by E. R. SILL 



FOR THE TRUTH, FOR THE RIGHT! ^ R . lowrt. 



From '■ Happy VoiCE8,''by permission. 
3 




1. For the truth, for the right, gath-er all in our band, With our hearts firm and faithful, whatever be- 

2. For the dear Father -land, for the land that we love, For the flag of our country, each stripe and each 

3. Not«in blood, not in woe, is our vie- to-ry won, But in love pure and deep as the beauti-ful 



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tide, Not a face showing fear, youthful warriors we stand, And the wrong flees before us, the Right's on our side ! 
star, Traitor hands strove in vain, still 'tis streaming above, Crowned with glory and honor, and gleaming afar ! 
sky, All the clouds scatter fast, ever shineth the sun, Eight is king, Eight is victor, and throned upon high! 



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For the Truth, for the Eight, singing joy - ful - ly, singing joy- ful- ly, As we lift our star- ry 



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ban - ner, and our shin - ing blades we draw, For the Truth, for the Eight, ours the 

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FOR THE TRUTH, FOR THE RIGHT! Concluded. 



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vie - to - ry, ours the vie - to - ry, Sound the cho - rus on for- ev - er, with a cheer, hip, hip, hurrah ! 



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DO RIGHT. 






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1. Though earthly in - ter- est takes flight, Or sobs up-on the sod; Still dare thou ev-er to "do right, And 

2. Though scoffs and jeers thy frenzied foes Roll on thee like a flood, Or weave a subtle web of woes — They 

3. Do right, and bravely bear each blow; A blessing will be given — If not in this bleak world below, In 



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leave the rest to God." Do what thy du-ty calls each day, Regard - less what the world may say. 
can - not harm the good; The clouds and shadows here they have, Project a glo - ry to the grave, 
yond - er smiling heaven; Walk in the way by vir-tue trod, "Do right, and leave the rest to God." 



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A BOY IS A liOT. (A plea for young America.) 



A. G. 




1. Remember a boy is a, boy, not a man. Don't frown when your patience he tries ; But bear with his follies as 

2. The eye that so often is kindled with joy, At sorrow will melt into tears ; For tender and warm is the 

3. Disorder may wait on the frolic and fun, And quietude fly at his noise ; But give not your mandates from 

4. And deck with attractions the family fold, Allurements which virtue approves ; For never despair tho' he's 
And teach him betimes tho good part to secure, Not pleasure nor glittering pelf; And point him the way to the 




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well as you can, And hope he will learn to be wise. Yes, a boy is a boy, and a boy let him be, For the 
heart of a boy, Tho' homely the coat that it wears, 
tyranny's throne, But govern with kindness the boys, 
careless and bold, If home is the spot that he loves, 
realms of the pure^By being a pilgrim yourself. 



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season of boyhood's a span-, And the heart that now leaps in its gladness and glee, Soon will ache with the cares of the man. 

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THE TRUE HERO 




1. Who is the lie - ro ? not the man Who on the go - ry field Hath battles fought and vict'ries won, And 

2. He maysiton a kingly throne, And sway a sceptre there, Or by the world unsung,unkno\vn, A 

3 To chain imperious passion down, To put a yoke on pride, The vile affec - tion to dethrone, The 



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forced the foe to yield : Go strew with flowers the victor's path, His brow with wreaths entwine, But earth a greater 
peasant's garb may wear: No matter whether bond or free, Or poor, or blest with wealth, The hero tru - ly 
bit - ter word to chide; 0, he who thus devotes his life, Of greater deeds can tell, Then he who braves the 

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he - ro hath, And nob - ler far than thine, 
great, is he Who ov - er- comes him - self, 
bat - tie strife, Or storms a cit - a - del. 

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To face the foe, to wield the sword, 

'Tis well for feeble age; 
'Tis well when manhood's soul is stirred, 

The holy war to wage ; 
But O, 'tis nobler for the youth, 

When summoned to the fight, 
Clad in the panoply of truth. 

To strike for God and right. 



56 



GIVE ME THE HEART THAT IS TENDER. 






1. give me the heart that is ten-der,That melts at the pleadingof grief; That spurns not the humble of- 

2. It dries up the fountain of sor-row, It lightens the spirit oppressed; It speaks of a brighter to- 

3. It nev - er grows weary of waiting, For fol-ly to turn and a - mend; But follows with gentle en- 

4. It knows neither par -ty nor station, It shelters no privileged few; It offers a home to all 



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fend - e-r, Withholds not the needed re - lief, 

morrow, And hope springs anew in the breast, 

treating, And loves and hopes on to the end. 

na- tions, What-ev - er the name or the hue. 



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give me the heart that is ten - der, And 
give me, &c. 



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give me, &c. 

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ev - er with char -i - ty warm; It nev- er shall want a defend-er, A shield in the pi - ti- less storm. 



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THE ORPHAN'S PRAYER. 



Tenderly. 



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Rev. A. A. GRAI.EY. 



57 



1. FrieDds of human - i-ty, list to my moan : I'm a poor orphan child, weary and lone ; Others may sing of the 
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joys of the home; Fatherless, motherless, pensive I roam; Fatherless, motherless, pensive I roam. 



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Closed are the eyes that once beamed upon me, 
Cold is the breast where my home used to be, 
Hushed is the voice which my sorrows beguiled, 
Hid in the grave are the friends of a child. 



While on the world's troubled bosom I weep, 
Dear ones, no sorrow disturbs your sweet sleep ; 
Fain would I bid to this region adieu, 
Share your oold pillow, and slumber with you. 



Pity me, children of gladness and glee ; 
Sunshine and flowers may your heritage be ; 
But there are joys that shall ever endure, 
Throned in the heart of the friend of the poor. 



God of the fatherless, motherless child, 
Temper the storm beating coldly and wild ; 
Thou who regardest an orphan's complaint, 
Heal the young heart that is bleeding and faint. 




HOME OF MY CHILDHOOD, FAREWELL. 



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1. Home of the lov - ing, the gen - tie, the ten - der, Spare ye one link from yonr sil - ver - y chain; 
'2. When the heart trembles with happy e - mo -tion, Round thee af - fee - tion shall ev - er entwine ; 

3. What tho' my pathway be scattered with treasures, Home that I love, bet-ter riches are thine; 

4. Home of the Father, my guide from life's morning, Home of the Moth - er, so ten -der and true, 

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Fast flow the tears as your joys I surren - der, Home, happy home shall I see you a - gamy 
Toss'd on the bil - lows of life's troubled ocean, Thou like a star in the darkness shall shine. 
What tho 1 my cup be o'er-flow - ing with pleasures, Still for the joys of my home will I pine. 
Home of the loved ones, the fireside a - doming, Home of my childhood, I bid thee adieu. 

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Fast flow 
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the tears as your joys I surren - der, Home, hap 
the bil - lows of life's troubled ocean, Thou like 
my cup be o'er-flow-ing with pleasures, Still for 
the loved ones, the fireside adorn - ing, Home of 
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■ py home, shall I see you again ? 
a star in the darkness shall shine, 
the joys of my home will I pine, 
my childhood, I bid thee adieu. 



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HOME OF MY CHILDHOOD. Concluded. 



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Home of my childhood, happy, hap - py home, Home of my childhood, happy, happy home, farewell. 

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THE STREAM OF LIFE. 

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1. O childhood! fresh fountain in sunlight upspringing,All round us thy music and radiance flinging, Dance 

2. O boyhood! bright brook that leaps on thro' the meadow. Loud laughing, deep quaffing the sunlight and shadow, Flow 

3. O manhood! ma - jes -tic and beautiful riv - er, Flow broader and deeper and mightier ev - er, With 



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on in thy pure and mel - o - di - ous play, And sing with thy joy all earth's sadness a - way. 
on with thy current so crys-tal - line clear, That the blue heaven shall stoop in thy breast to appear. 
strong waves of effort and is - lauds of rest, And banks which thy bounty for - ev - er hath blest. 

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i Old age ! quiet-bay where the deep-bosomed river, 
Lies calmly at rest after life-long endeavor, 
Still bright with heaven's starlight serenely draw nigh 
The infinite ocean whose shore is the sky. 



5 O mortal ! keep spotless the current thou bearest ! 
The fountain that's purest will make the brook fairest; 
The clear brook a beautiful river will be: 
The broader the river, the grander the sea. 



60 Words by Miss PROCTER. 

With varied expression 



HOME-SICKNESS. 



H. KlNGSBURT. 



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1. Where I am, the halls are gilded, Stored with pictures bright and i - are; Strains of deep, melodious music Float up- 

2. Where I am, the sun is shining, And the purple windows glow, Till their rich armorial shadows Stain the 

3. Where I am, the days are passingO'er a pathway strewn with flowers; Song, and joy, and starry pleasures Crown the 
i. Where I am, all think me happy, For so well I play my part, None can guess, who smile around me, How far 



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on the perfumed air:-Nothir:g stirs the dreary silence Save the melancholy sea, Near the poor and humble 

marble floor below :-Faded autumn leaves are trembling On the withered jas'mine tree, Creeping round the little 

happy,smiling hours :-Slowly,heavily,and sadly, Time with weary wings must flee, Marked by pain, and toil, and 

dis - tant is my heart, -Far away, in a poor cottage, Listening to the dreary sea, Where the treasures of my 



HOME - SICKNESS. Concluded. 




cot-tage, Where I fain would be ! Where I fain would be ! Where I fain would be ! 

casement, Where I fain would be ! &c. 
sor-row, Where I fain would be ! <fec. 
life are, Where I fain would be ! &c. 



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Words by E. R. Sill. 
Brightly. 

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SUNBEAMS. 



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Sunbeams, sunbeams,golden stair! Angels descending, Mortals defending, -Sunbeams, sunbeams everywhere! 
Shining, shining pure and fair, Banishing sadness, Pouring its gladness, Shining, shining everywhere! 
Sparkling, sparkling rich and rare, Where the dews quiver, On the bright river, Sparkling, sparkling everywhere! 

Cheering, cheering want and care, In the close city Smiling in pity, Cheering, cheering everywhere! 
Blessing, blessing earth and air, Buds in the meadow, Hearts in the shadow, Blessing, blessing everywhere 
Beauty, beauty — world so fair, Light in all places, Love in all faces, Beauty, beauty everywhere! 



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HOME AGAIN. 



Rx^. A. A. GRALEY 




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1. Home, happy home, to thy portals I fly, Drawn by the ties that no absence can sev - er; 

2. When thro' the mansions of greatness I've strayed, Fashioned in beauty, and garnished with treasure; 

3. No gaudy pleasures em- blaz- on thy halls, Humble art thou as the flower of the wildwood; 

4. Loved ones, the sea-son of absence is o'er, When the low spi - rit complained in its sadness, 




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Dim with the tear-drops of joy is the eye, Gazing up - on thee as fond - ly as ev - er. 
Sad - ly I've turned from the pride and parade, Longed for my home and its in - nocent pleasure. 
But there's a charm which my spirit enthralls, Herein the dear hap- py home of my childhood. 
'Round the dear hearth let us meet as of yore, Blending to - geth-er our griefs and our sadness. 




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Home of my childhood no longer I roam, Home of my childhood no longer I roam ; Home of my childhood my 



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HOME AGAIN. Concluded. 



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dear happy home, Nearer, and dearer than ev-er. Home of my childhood, my dear happy home, Nearer, and dearer than ever, 

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UEAUTIFUL SPRING. 






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1. Beauti - 1'ul spring has come again, With beautiful showers of silv-er rain, Budding trees and balm-y 

2. Beauti - ful robins sweetly sing Their beautiful songs of love and spring, Bluebirds flit from tree to 

3. Beauti - ful snowdrops bending low, The beautiful spir - its of the snow, Pe - tals pure and drooping 

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air, And sun - shine smil 
tree, On wings as a - 
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drop laughs a gem. 

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Beautiful violets' perfect hue, 
With beautiful eyes of heaven's own blue, 
Yellow crocus-cups so sweet, 
That kiss the print of April's feet. 



Beautiful spring ! to hearts of men, 
Thy beautiful smile gives hope again, 
Life and love, that slept in gloom. 
Now wake, and bud, and brightly bloom. 



64 THE OLD SCHOOL BOOK. A A 

1. On the Old School Book in its dust-y nook, With a tear-ful eye I gaze: Comedown, old friend, for a: 



the Old School Book in its dust-y nook, With a tear-ful eye I 



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task that vexed the brain ; The les-son ddne,and the vict'ry won, And I feel I'm a child a - gain 

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4 But we'll sing no more of the days of yore, 

For the tear-drop dims the eye ; 
Sleep on, old book, in thy dusty nook, 

As in years that have glided by ; 
No gilt we trace in thy honest face, 

But a mine of gold within 
Enriched the youth, as they sought for 
truth 

In the old house upon the green. 



'2 And I seem to stand with the youthful 
band 

In the old house on the green ; 
I hear the fun ere the school begun, 

And I join in the gladsome scene; 
I take my place with a sober face, 

O'ar the well-carved desk I bend; 
And hourly pore o'er the learned lore 

Of thy wonderful page, old friend. 



3 Then our cares were few, and our friends 
were true, 

And our griefs were rare and light ; 
The world was naught (ro we fondly 

But a region of pure delight, [thought,) 
But time has sped, and our path has led 

Through the dark and tearful scene ; 
And passed away are the good and gay, 

Like the old house upon the green. 




MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD. 



A. A. G. 



65 



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1. Life's ros - y morn has passed away, Its sunny noon has fled; I pensive walk the silent vale, With 

2. Sweet hours, no cankering care ye brought, To dim with tears the eye ; Or if a cloud with sorrow fraught Swept 

3. The songs I sung in ear - ly days In notes to melt or cheer, From happy home, and woodland wild, Now 



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evening shades o'erspread : I backward trace life's checkered path, Its sunshine and its showers, And mem'ry's 
o'er the sunny sky, As falls the gentle dew on flowers, When 6inks the sun to rest.So gently fell the 
strike up-on my ear: I hear them as I hear a strain, On some far distant shore, Oh, could I sing them 



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'twine a- round My childhood's hap - py hours, 
bri - ny showers Up - on the youthful breast, 
now, as then, And be a child once more ! 



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So pass away earth's choicest sweets 

Before the march of time; 
So let them pass, for faith discerns 

A fairer, purer clime: 
Friends of my youth, we'll meet again 

In Eden's fadeless bowers, 
And sing in louder, sweeter strain 

The joys of childhood's hours. 



66 



THE RESTING PLACE. 



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1. I'm but a pilgrim here below, I hare no portion here: And this is not my rest I know, 

2. What fond endearments round me 'twine.But ah! how brief their stay; I gaze, but while I call them mine, 

3. There's danger lurking in the bliss, To which we fondly turn; As flowers tho' robed in love-li- ness, 



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Then welcome toil and care. But there's a rest for me, But there's a rest for me: 
They fade, and pass a - way. But there's a rest for me, &c. 
Se-crete the rankling thorn. But there's a rest for me, &c. 



On Jesus' breast the 



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i Sweet rest, eternal rent to come, 
Thy foretastes cheer me here; 
They lure me upward to my home, 
And for that home prepare. Cho. 

6 This earth is not my resting place, 
It hinders and defiles; 
I'll take my staff and onward press, 
Thro' darkness, tears and toils. Cho 



REST IN TOIL. 



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1. There's rest for the weary in E - den I know, But is there no rest for the weary be - 

2. O live for the welfare of children of woe, Be angels of mer -cy wherev - er you 



low? Shall 
go, And 



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sor - row and tears all the her - i - tage be, Of those who are bound to the land of the free ? Of 
you may re-joicein a val - ley of tears, And cheerful - ly bat - tie with foes and with fears, And 




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those who are bound to the land of the free ? 
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3. 

Go forth in the desert, and hopefully cast 
Thy bread on the stream that is hurrying past, 
A blessing shall come from the Father above, 
And thou shalt rejoice in thy labor of love. 

4. 
O yes, for the weary there's rest here below, 
The rest is in toiling as onward you go; 
From life's rosy dawn, to its sober decline, 
Keep toiling, and rest for the weary is thine. 




THERE'S REST UP ABOVE, 



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1. A lesson to learn and a burden to bear, A sorrow to meet and a .virtue to prove, such is hu - 

2. The sun will not shine all the way to the grave, Life's river not always will placidly move; For clouds will a- 

3. If bitter the cup that is pressed to your lip, Eemember the Father who holds it is Love; He'll pardon the 
4. When might conquers right, and the wicked rejoice, Don't sigh for escape like a tremulous dove; For God and hu- 

5. Then bear ev'ry cross, ev'ry duty perform, Constrained by the power of unspeakable Love; Press onward and 

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man - l - ty's work ev - ery where ; But never despond, for there's rest up a- bove. Nev - er despond, 
rise, and the storm lash the wave, But never despond, for there's rest up a- bove. 
tear-drop, for na - ture will weep, But never despond, for there's rest up a- bova. 
man - i - ty lift up the voice, But never despond, for there's rest up a- bove. 
upward thro' sunshine and storm, But never despond, for there's rest up a- bove. 

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never despond, for there's rest, rest up above. Rest, rest, sweet rest.Never despond, for there's rest, rest up above. 

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Words by Mies PROCTER 
Gently. 



REST AT EVENING. 



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After a passage from Mendelssohn. 



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1. When the wear-i-ness of life is end - ed, And the task of our long day is done, And the 

2. How far back will seem the sun's first dawning, And those early mists so cold and gray! Half for- 

3. Vain will seem the impatient heart, which waited Toils that gathered but too quickly round; And the 



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props, on which our hearts depended, All have failed or broken, one by one; Evening and our sorrow's shadow 

gotten even the toil of morning, And the heat and burthen of the day: Flowers that we were tending, and weeds 

childish joy, so soon elated At the path we thought none else had found; And the foolish ardor soon a - 



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blended, Telling us that peace is now begun: 
scorning. Withered all alike and cast away. 
- bated By the storm which cast us to the ground. 

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4. Vain those pauses on the road, each seeming 

As our final home and resting-place ; 
And the leaving them while tears were streaming 

Of eternal sorrow down our face ; 
And the hands we held, fond folly dreaming 

That no future could their touch efface. 

5. All will then be faded: — night will borrow 

Stars of light to crown our perfect rest; 
And the dim vague memory of faint sorrow 

Just remain to show us all was best, 
Then melt into a divine to-morrow :— 

O how poor a day to be so blestl 



70 



LANDOFBEAUTT. 



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1. When we meet be - side the ri - ver, With its bright and gen-tle flow; Ne-ver more our hearts shall 

2. There the verdant vales and mountains Never sickly blast shall know; There the flowers, and sil-ver 

3. Herts the cross, and we will bear it, Thro' the sunshine and the gloom; There's the crown.and we shall 

4. Here our songs and tears are blended, And each pleasure has its sting, There we'll reign (by grace be- 

5. Land of beau - ty, thou art dear-er, When by faith thy joys we see; Land of beau-ty, thou art 




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qui - ver, With the har-mo - nies of woe. Then we'll walk the path of duty, Whether strewn with thorns or 
fountains Ev-er bloom, and ev - er flow. Then, &c. 
wear it, When we've safe arrived at home. Then, &c. 
friended) In the ci - ty of our King. Then, &c. 
near - er When we dai - ly press to thee. Then, &c. 

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flowers, Till we reach the land of beau - ty, Where no storm of sor - row lowers. 



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UNDER THE WILLOW. 




1. Under the willow, Earth for her pillow, 

2, Soft be thy pillow, Un - der the willow, 
3 Tossed on life's billow, Oft to the willow, 
4. Eest on thy pillow, Un - der the willow, 



Sadly we've laid her to rest; . . . 
Shading in pi - ty thy tomb ; . . 
Pensive at twilight we'll rove;. . 
What tho' thy beauty departs;. . 



While we are weeping, 
Soft fall the showers 
Long to embrace thee, 
Tend- er af- fec-tions, 



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CHORUS. 




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Sweetly she's sleeping, Calm is the once troubled breast. But we will meet thee, Once more will greet thee, 
On the bright flowers, Yielding their fragrant perfume. 
Once more replace thee In the dear circle of love. 
Sweet recollections, We will enshrine in our hearts. 






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Perfect in beauty and love; Yes, we'll behold thee, To our hearts fold thee, When we rejoin thee above. 



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72 



LITTLE NELL. 



A. A. O. 




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1. Did you ev- er know our dear Little Nell? She was fair -est of the fair, Lit -tie Nell; There was 



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2. O, our soul you oft-en stirred, Little Nell, When you caroled like a bird, Lit -tie Nell; And our 

3. But they wanted thee above, Little Nell, So the Father who is love, Lit -tie Nell; Sent an 

4. So we laid thee in the grave, Little Nell, Where the grass shall gently wave, Little Nell; And the 



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sunshine in her face, For it bore not sorrow's trace, As she moved with winsome grace, Lit-tle Nell, 
sorrows would take wing, When your merry laugh would ring Like a harp of tuneful string, Lit-tle Nell. 
angel form so bright, As we watched thee in the night, And thy spir-it took its flight, Lit-tle Nell. 
flowers shall brightly bloom, And shall breathe a sweet perfume, Round thy snowy marble tomb. Little Nell. 



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Darling Little Nell, Gen- tie Lit-tle Nell, Man-y hearts are yearning for thee; Tho' you 



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walk the streets of gold, By the prophets sung of old, O, we iniss thee from our fold, Little Nell. 






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Words by PERCIVAL. 




THE SPRING IS COMING. 

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spring, the spring is coming, The birds are merri - ly sing - ing ; The spring, the spring is coming, We 

yellow buds are breaking, The flowers in meadow are blooming. And gentle winds are play - ing A- 

spring, the spring is with us, And light the swallow is flit - ting ; The spring, the spring is with us, — It 



1. The 

2. The 

3. The 



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hear the night- in - gale,- 
long the grass - y vale, 
brings the night- in - gale,- 



In shade of rose, at evening, We hear the night-in - gale. 
A - round the air - y mountain, And down the grass- y vale. 
In cool of shad- y evening, It brings the night- in - gale. 



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THE MARINER'S GRATE. 



Rev. R. LOWRY. Arr. 



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1. The ma - riner's grave in the beautiful sea! Where the fetterless billows are roaming so free; Where the 

2. A - way from the fu - ry and din of the shore, His slumbers are still 'mid the hurricane's roar; But the 

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Cho. The ma - riner's grave ! The ma - riner's grave ! The billows are guard-ing the mariner's grave : Tho' 






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breakers are dashing, and hoi - low winds rave; Oh ! where is the spot like the ma - riner's grave ! 
mus - ic that's floating from wave un - to wave, Is the wa-ter-sprite's song o'er the ma - riner's grave ! 



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sur - ges are dashing and hoi - low winds rave, The pal - ace of rest is the ma - rmer s grave ! 



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The cor - al his pil - low, the sea-weed his bed, With the sen -tinel stars shining bright o'er his head; The 
The hand of the ruthless will nev - er in-vade, The wave-shrouded tomb where the sailor is laid;Where the 




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foaming white sur - ges his se-pul-chre lave, And the mountains are hit,n 'round the ma - liner's grave, 
pal - ings of tim-ber and steel can - not save, The spray will leap high 'round the ma - riner's grave. 



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TVords by PERCIVAL 
Gently. 



THE NIGHT IS STILL. 



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1. The night is still: on meadow and silvery fountain The moon-beam sleeps, like innocence cradled in love: With 

2. A cloud sails by, with lightest and easiest motion, Now bossed with pearl, now shining with purple and gold; It 

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softened smile, it rests on the snow of the mountain, And tints the sky, like wing of ethe-re - al dove, 
glides a - way, like vessel a -far on the ocean, And spirits of bliss seem borne on its sil-ver-y fold. 

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3 A gentle wind, with fragrance of jessamine laden, 
Steals faintly on, as longing for calm and repose, 
And with it steals the lingering song of the maiden, 
Whose lonely heart is lightened by song of its woes. 



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4 O, list the song [-if beauty and innocence ever [strain, 
Have touched thy soul, thy heart will respond to the 
The voice of love, of sorrow, and longing, will never, 
In soothing tones, be lost to thy spirit again. 



GOD ON THE OCEAN. 



a . a . a. 






1. We were crowded in the cabin, Not a soul did dare to sleep : It was midnight on the waters, And a 
So we shuddered there in silence,For the stoutest held his breath, While the hungry sea was roaring, And the 
3. But his little daughter whispered, .As she to»k his i - cy hand, " Is not God upon the ocean, Just the 



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storm was on the deep, "fis a fear - ful thing in winter, To be shattered in the blast, And to 

breakers talked with Death. Aswe sad - ly sat in darkness, Each one busy at his prayers, "We are 

same as on the land !" Then we kissed the lit-tle maiden, And we spoke in bet - ter cheer, And we 

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hear the rattling trumpet thunder, "Cut away the mast," And to hea - the rattling trumpet thunder, " Cut away the mast!" 

lost!" the captain shouted. As he staggered down the stairs, "We are lost!" the captain shouted. As he staggered down the stairs. 

anchored safe in harbor, When the morn was shiningclear. And we anchored safe in harbor, When the morn was shining clear. 



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BE STILL. 



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1. Come, bring me wild pinks from the valleys, A-blaze with the fire of the sun; No poor lit-tle pi-ti-ful 

2. Choose tunes with a lul-la- by flowing, And sing thro' the watches you keep; Be soft with your coming and 

3. Be low, O be low with your weeping ! Your sobs would be sorrow to her; I tremble lest while she is 



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li - lies 
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That speak of a life that is done. 
Be soft ! she is fall- ing a - sleep. 
A rose on her pil - low should stir. 

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And op - en the windows 
Ah, what would my life be 
Sing slow - er, sing soft-er 



to lighten This 
without her! Pray 
and low - er ! Her 



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wearisome chamber of pain — The eyes of my darling will brighten To see the green hill-tops a -gain. 
God that I never may know ! Dear friends, as you gather about her, Be low with your weeping — be low. 
sweet cheek is losing its red — Sing lower, ay, — lower and lower — Be still, O be still ! She is dead. 




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78 



SPRING. 



A. A. B. 




1. Birds are sing - ing, 

2. Ceased the snowing, 

3. No more coldness, 

4. Pluck the flow -ers, 



Sun - shine flinging Warmth and radiance all around ; Flowers are blooming, 
Streams are flowing Free as bird up - on the wing; From the fountain 
Nor with boldness Shall the Storm King rule and reign ; Ope the door now. 
Deck the bow-ers, Round the brow the wreath entwine ; Raise your voi -ces, 



CHORUS. 







And per - fum-ing, Ver - dant freshness decks the ground. Hap - py spring-time, hap-py spring-time, 

Down the mountain, 'Tis the mer - ry time of spring. 

Win - ter's o'er now, Balm - y spring ra - turns a - gain. 

Earth re - joi - ces, Beau - ti - fled by love di - vine. 



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Emblem of our ear - ly youth, Happy childhood, happy childhood, When adorned with love and truth. 



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Words by D. F. McCARTnT. 
Gently. 



SUMMER LONGINGS. 



H KINGSBURY. 



79 



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1. Ah! my heart is wear-y waiting, Wait-ing for the May — 

2. Ah! my heart is sick with longing, Longing for the May— 

3. Ah! my heart is sore with sighing, Sigh- ing for the May — 

4. Ah! my heart is pained with throbbing/Throbbing for the May— 



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Wait-ing for the pleasant rambles, 

Long- ing to es-cape from stu-dy, 

Sigh - ing for their sure re - turn-ing, 

Throbbing for the sea - side bil-lows, 



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When the fragrant hawthorn brambles With the woodbine al - ter - nat-ing, Scent the dew - y way. 

To the young face fair and rud-dy, And the thousand charms belonging To the summer's day. 

When the summer beams are burning, Hopes and flowers that, dead or dying. All the win - ter lay. 

Or the wa - ter-woo - ing willows; Where in laughing and in sobbing, Glide the streams away. 

A. A. A. A- A- A. A. 

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Ah! my heart is wear-y waiting, Wait-ing lor the May. 

Ah! my heart is sick with longing, Longing for the May. 

Ah! my heart is sore with sighing, Sighing for the May. 

Ah! my heart, my heart is throbbing, Throbbing for the May. 






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Waiting sad, dejected, weary, 
Waiting for the May: — 
Spring goes by with wasted warnings — 
Moonlit evenings, sunbright mornings- 
Summer comes, yet dark and dreary 

Life still ebbs away; 

Man is ever weary, weary, 

Waiting for the Mayl 



Words by PERCIVAL 




THE LAST DAYS OF AUTUMN. 



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1. Now the growing year is o - ver, And the shepherd's tinkling hell Faintly from its winter cov - er 

2. Now the mist is on the mountains, Reddening in the ris - ing sun; Now the flowers around the fountains 

3. Now the torrent brook is stealing Faintly down the furrowed glade, -Not as when in win-ter pealing 

4. Darkly blue the mist is hovering Round the clifted rock's bare height, All the bordering mountains covering 

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Rings a low farewell: — Now the birds of Autumn shiver, Where the withered beech-leaves quiver, 
Per - ish one by one: — Not a spire of grass is growing, But the leaves that late were glowing 
Such a din it made, That the sound of cataracts falling Gave no ech - o so ap - pall-ing, 
With a dim uncertain light :-Now a fresh - er wind pre- vail-ing, Wide its heav-y bur - den sail-ing, 



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O'er the dark and lazy river, In the rocky dell. 
Now its blighted green are strowing With a mantle dun. 
As its hoarse and heavy brawling In the pine's black shade. 
Deepens as the day is failing, Fast the gloom of night. 



5. 

Slow the blood-stained moon is riding 

Through the still and hazy air, 
Like a sheeted spectre gliding 

In a torch's glare:— 
Few the hours her light is given, — 
Mingling clouds of tempest driven 
O'er the mourning face of heaven, 
All is blackness there. 



Words by PERCIVAL. 

J*_2 



MORNING TWILIGHT. 



H. K. 81 




1. The mountains are lihie in the morning air. And the woods are sparkling with deny light ; The winds, as they wind thro' the 

2. The pare blue sky i* in calm repose, The pil - low - y clouds are sleeping there; So still- y the brook in its 

3. Pure and beautiful thoughts, at thisear-ly hour, Gooff to the home of the bright and blest ; They steal on the heart with an 




hollows, bear The breath of the blossoms that wake by night. Wide ov - er the bending meadows roll The 
eov- ert flows, You would think its mur-mur a breath of air. The wa - ter that floats in the glass - y pool, Half 
unseen power. And its passionate throbbings are laid at rest: O. who would not catch from the quiet sky, And the 






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mists like a lightly moving sea: The sun is not ris-en.— and o'erthewhole There hovers a si - lent rays- ter- y. 
hid by the willows that line its brink. In its deep recess has a look so cool, One would worship its nymph, as he bent to drink, 
mountains that soar in the hazy air, When his harbinger tells that the sun is nigh. The visions of bliss that are floating there. 



82 Words hy E. R. SILL 

Gen/h/. 



EVENING TWILIGHT. 



Arranged. 



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1. When the dim twilight comes creeping O - ver the earth and the sky, When every blossom is 

2. When the day's la - bor is end - ed, And the last beams of the sun Low in the West have de ■ 

3. When on the broad southern o- coan, Leagues from the sight of the land, Calmed is the bil-low's com 

4. Sweet to the child that is grieving, Homeless, no comfort- er nigh, Comes the still an-gel of 



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sleep - ing, Dreaming of star-fiow'rs on high; 

scend - ed, And the fair night has be - gun ; 

mo - tion, As the deep night is at band ; 

eve - ning, Bringing down peace from on high ; 

— a 1* — -0- 



While the rose-flushes fade out of the West, 

Then to the wan -der - er mem - o-ries come, 

Then as he watches the brightening star, 

So to our spir - its, lost children of heaven, 



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While the bird nestles to sleep in his nest, Then recollections come thronging, Echoes of moments gone by. 
Dreams of dear hearts that await him at home, Twilight brings back the old faces, Bright as of yore every-ono. 
Muses the sail - or of loved ones a-far, Gather their forms with the shadows, Howsoe'er distant they stand. 
Sweet is the coming of beautiful Even, When like the lights of home-windows, Stars beckon down from the sky. 



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«"ords by Mrs. HEMAN'S. 



THE MESSENGER BIRD. Arr. from ari old melody by H. K. 83 



(Some of the native Brazilians pay great veneration to a certain bird that sing* mournfully in the night-time. They say it is a 
messenger, which their deceased friends have sent, and that it brings news from the other world. — Piccart's Ceremonies and Religious. ) 
Gently. . | 




1. Them art come from the spir- it land, thou bird ! Thou art come from the spirit land ! From the dark pine 

2. We know that the bowers are green and fair In the light of that summer shore, And we know that the 




grove let thy voice be heard, And tell of the shadowy band, 
friends we have lost are there, They are there, and weep no more, 



And tell of the shadowy band ! 
Thev are there, and weep no more, 

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3 Ami we know they have quenched their fever's tliir3t 

In the fountain of youth* ere now ; 
For there must the stream in its freshness hurst, 
Which none may find helow. 

4 Ami ne know that they will not he lured to earth 

From the land of deathless flowers. 
By the feast, or the dance, or the song of mirth, 
Though their hearts were one with ours. 

5 Though tliey sat with us by the night-fire's blaze, 

And bent with us the bow, 
And heard t lie titles of our father's days, 
Which are told to others now. 



6 But tell us, thou bird of the solemn strain, 

Can those who have loved, forget? 

We call, and they answer not again,--- 

Do they love — do they love us yet? 

7 Doth the warrior think of his brother there, 

And the father of his child? 
And the chieftain of those who were wont to share 
His wanderings through the wild ? 

8 We call them far through the silent night, 

Hut they speak not from cave or hill ; 
And we know, thou bird, that their land is bright, — 
But say, do they love there still ? 



(An expedition was actually undertaken by Juan Ponce de I.eoo. in the Ifith century, with the view of discovering a wonderful 
fountain ; believed by the natives jf Puerto Rico tu spring in ine of the Lucay Isles, and to pos»-sB the virtue of restoring youth to all 



»lio bathed in its waters.) 



84 



E. R. SILL. 



MOONLIGHT. 



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1. Golden moonlight floods the forest, Sea of splendor, calm and bright, And the stars can scarcely 

2. Fai-ries dance in shad - y places, Elves are trooping, hand in hand, And the so - ber earth is 

3. Earth is what the hours may make it, Bright and bus - y at the noon, But a fair and golden 




rip - pie 'Its repose with trembling light. 
brightened In - to wondrous fai - ry - land, 
elf-land 'Neath the magic of the moon 



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All the sounds of earth are silent, Hushed in sleep its voices 
In the heart, so dim with shadow,Falls the moonlight's tender 
Life is what the heart may make it. Friendship is a sun - ny 



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lie, Save the faint and fit - ful mu-sic Of the breeze that murmurs by. All the sounds of earth are 

smile, Dreamy musings, wand'ring fancies Half its weariness be - guile. In the heart, so dim with 

light,' Love is like a tide of glory, Turning all things heavenly bright. Life is what the heart may 

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MOONLIGHT. Concluded. 



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silent. Hushed in sleep its voices lie, Save the faint and fit - fill rnu-sic Of the breeze that murmurs by! 
shadow, Falls the moonlight's tender smile, Dreamy musings, wand'ring fancies Half its weariness he - guile, 
make it, Friendship is a sunny light, Love is like a tide of glo - ry, Turning all things heavenly bright. 




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On the wings of win-ter winds, Harshly o'er me 
To the breath of summer air, Balm a - bout me 
In the springtime's gentle breeze, Sol't-ly round me 
To the wailing autumn wind, Past our footsteps 



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blow - ing, 
throw-ing, 
flow - ing, 
blow - ing, 






Once a heed - less 
I a scorn- fill 
Songs of hope I 
Faithful love I 
S S 



word I threw, 
answer cast, 
mingled fair, 
flung aside, 




All 
All 
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its sting unknowing. 

its hurt unknowing. 

■ ture hours unknowing. 

its grace unknowing. 



winter, can ye tell Where that word so bit-ter 
Breath of summer, wilt thou say If its pain can pass a - 
Lisp it not, breeze of spring, Why those songs no more I 
Wind of autumn, haste away, Find the love I lost that 



fell? 
way ? 
sing! 
day! 



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Words by PERCITAL. 



THE SPIRIT'S LULLABY. 



H. K. 






1. When the night is still, On the moonlit hill We sink in soft re - pose: Wliile the cool winds sigh, And the rivulet 

2. Hushed to slumber deep, Softly then we sleep, And happy is our dream ; Forms of beauty rare, Float a-long the 



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nigh In mellow music flows. Then, as in dreams we float in light along. Sweet round us breathes from heaven a cradle song: 
air ; Their eyes how kindly beam. Then, as we listen, harps around us play, Gentlest of voic-es bid us come a- way: 









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Slumber! Slumber! Angels watch you nigh ! Slumber! Slumber! Spirits, gathering by. Sing their lul-la - by. 
Hith-er! hith er ! where the heavens are bright. Hither! hith-er! To this world of light. Hither take your flight. 



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Words by WILLiAM MOTHERWELL, 
Pathetically 



THE MIDNIGHT WIND. 



H. KINGSBURY. 



87 




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1. Mourn-ful - ly ! O, mourn-ful - ly This midnight wind doth sigh, Like some sweet plaintive 

2. Mourn-ful - ly ! O, mourn-ful - ly This midnight wind doth moan ! It stirs the chord of 

3. Mourn-ful - ly ! O, mourn-ful - ly This midnight wind doth swell With its quaint, pen-sive 



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mel - o - dy Of a - ges long gone 
mem- o - ry In each dull, heav - y 
min- strel-sy, — Hope's pas-sion - ate fare - 



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by ! It speaks a tale of oth - er years, — Of 

tone; The voi - ces of the much-loved dead Seem 

well To the dream-y joys of ear - ly years, Ere 




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hopes that bloomed to die, — Of sun - ny 
float-ing there - up - on, — All, all my 
yet grief's can - ker fell On the heart's 






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smiles that set in tears, And loves that mouldering lie ! 
fond heart cher - ish-ed Ere death had made it lone, 
bloom, -ay! well may tears Start at that part - ing knell ! 

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88 Words by E. R. SILL. 

Gently, mf 



NATURE'S CALL. 



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1. Nature's voices, hear them singing. "Come, oh come! "Like sweet bells of silver ringing, "Come, oh come! " 

2. Sings the brooklet in the meadow, "Come, oh come! " Loud or low in sun or shadow, "Come, oh come!" 

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From the busy crowd retreating, Seek we now the wildwood'a greeting, "Welcome.welcome home ' Welcome, welcome liome ! " 
In its waves our troubles flinging. Follow its soft ripples singing, "Welcome.welcome borne ! Welcome.welcome borne ! " 



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3. Whispers from the woods entreat us 

"Come, oh come !" 
Warbling birds fly forth to meet us, 

' ' Come, oh come ! " 
Earth, and air, and sunlight falling 
Claim us as their children, calling, 

"Welcome, welcome home!" 

4. Breezes call us, swelling, dying, 

"Come, oh come !" 
Down the distance sinking, sighing, 

" Come, oh come ! " 
Scatter on their wings our sorrow, 
From that tone new courage borrow, 

"Welcome, welcome home ! " 



5. Softly sings the placid river, 

"Come, oh come ! " 
From our cares it beckons ever, 

"Come, oh come ! " 
From life's selfish fret and fever 
Sweet the murmur of the river, 

"Welcome, welcome home ! " 

6. Balm and beauty without measure, 

"Come, oh come ! " 
Rest, and peace, and purest pleasure, 

"Come, oh come ! " 
Unto nature's bosom clinging, 
Hear her voice so softly singing, 

" Welcome, welcome home 1 " 



Words by Ml33 PROCTER 

With expression . 



GOLDEN DATS. 



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Arranged from GOUNOD'S Faust. 89 



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1. Golden days — where are they ? Pilgrims east and west Cry; if we could find them. We would 

2. Golden days — where are they ? Ask of childhood's years, Still untouched by sor - row.Still un - 

3. Golden days — where are they ? Has Love learnt the spell. That will charm them hith- er, Near our 

4. Golden days — where are they ? Far-ther up the hill, I can hear the ech - o Faintly 

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pause and rest : We would pause and rest a lit - tie From our long and wea - ry 

dimmed by tears: Ah, they seek a phan-tom Fu - ture, Crowned with bright-er, star- ry 

hearth to dwell ? In - se - cure are all her treasures, Eest - less is her anx - ious 

call - ing still : Faint-ly call - ing, faint - ly dy - ing, In a far - off mist - y 




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ways: — Where are they, Where are they 

rays; — Where are they, Where are they 

gaze : — Where are they, &c. 

haze : — Where are they, &c. f 

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then, where are they, where are they — Gold 
then, where are they, where are they — Gold 



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days ? 
days? 



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Wonls by WM. MOTHERWELL. 



THE WATER! THE WATER! 



H. KIXGSBURT. 




1. The wa 

2. The wa 

3. The wa 



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- ter ! the 

- ter ! the 



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wa - ter ! The joy- ous brook for me, That tun-eth thro' the qui - et night Its 
wa - ter ! The gen - tie stream for me, That gush-es from the old gray stone, Be- 
ter ! The dear and bless- ed thing, That all day fed the lit-tle flowers On 



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ev - er- liv - ing glee. The wa - ter ! the wa - ter ! That sleepless, merry heart, Which gurgles on un- 
side the al- der tree. The wa - ter ! the wa - ter ! That ev- er-bubbling spring I loved and looked on 
its banks blossoming. The wa - ter ! the wa - ter ! That murmured in my ear Hymns of a saint-like 



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stint - ed - ly, And 
while a child, In 
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To all a-round it, some small measure 
And ask - ed it whence it came and went, 
And whis - per in the gates of heav - en, 






THE WATER! Concluded. 

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Of its own most per-i'ect pleasure. The wa - ter! the wa - ter ! The joy - oris brook for rue ! 

And when its treasure would be spent. The wa - ter! the wa - ter ! The gen - tie stream for me! 

How meek a pilgrim had been shriven. The wa - ter! the wa - ter ! The dear and bless- ed thing! 

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IN THE WOOD. 



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H. K. 



Words bv Miss TROCTER. 





1. In the wood where shadows are deepest From the branches overhead, Where the wild wood-strawberries clus- 







ter, And the soft-est moss is spread, I met to- clay with a fai - ry, And I followed her where she led. 



PIPISIP 




2 Some magical words she uttered, 
I alone could understand, 
For the sky grew bluer and brighter; 

While there rose on either hand 
The cloudy walls of a palace, 
That was built in Fairy-land. 



3 And I stood in a strange enchantment; 

I had known it all before: 
In 1 1 y heart of hearts was the magic 

Of days that will come no more, 
The magic, of joy departed, 

That Time can never restore. 



4 That never, ah ! never, never, 

Never again can be: — 
Shall I tell you what powerful fairy 

Built up this palace for me ? 
It was only a little white violet 

I found at the root of a tre« 



92 Words by C. C MORGAN. 



THE OLD HOUSE ON THE HILL. 



A. A. O. 




1. Twilig 

2. Fancy 

3. Once 



lit shadows fell around me, Bright eyed stars shone from above, As an Au-gust evening found me 

spread her mantle o'er me, Memory's pencil sketched the scene, And on magic wings they bore me 

a - gain the birds were singing On the trees about the door, And the bu -sy bees were bringing 



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Near the spot I dear-ly love. And I listened to the murmur Of the bright and laughing rill, 
Thro' the mazes of the dream; And a form comes forth to meet me, Ah! rnethinks I see it still! 
Home their treasured winter store. Hark ! I hear a kind voice speaking (Ay! a voice that death has still'd) 




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As I stood a weary wanderer, By 
And I hear a voice that greets me At 
As we clasped our hands in greeting At 

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Night her mantle drew around me, 
■*" Moon and stars like silver shone, 

the Old House on the Hill. Yet a mystic spell still bound me 
the Old House on the Hill. To my childhood's happy home, 
the Old House on the Hill. Not a sound disturbed the wildwood 
,N | ... On that evening calm and still, 

As I dreamed of home and childhood 
By the Old House on the Hill. 



Si 



Wonlsby TENNYSON. 
With swellirm expression. 

-A 



BUGLE SONG. 



H. KIXGSBURT. 93 




1. The splendor falls on cas - tie - walls 

2. hark ! O hear ! how thin and clear, 

3. O love, they die in yon rich sky ; 



And snow - y summits old in sto - rv ; 

And thin - ner, clear-er, far-ther go - ing \ 

They faint on hill, or field, or riv - er ; 



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long light shakes a-cross the lakes, 
sweet and far, from cliff and scar, 
ech - oes roll from soul to soul, 



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And the wild cataract leaps in glo - ry. 
The horns of Elf-land faint- ly blow-ing ! 
And grow for - ev - er and for - ev - er. 



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Blow, bu-gle, 

Blow, let us 
Blow, bu- gle, 

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blow! set the wild echoes flying: Blow, bugle ; answer echoes, — dy-ing, dy-ing, dy - ing ! 

hear the pur - pie glens replying : Blow, bugle ; answer echoes, — dy-ing, dy-ing, dy-ing! 

blow! set the wild echoes flying, And answer, ech-oes answer, — dy-ing, dy-ing, dy-ing! 

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94 



With expression. 



NELLIE LOST AND FOUND. henry c work 

From " Silver Lute." by permission of Root k Cadt. 






-JSh. 



1. Ten o' clock ! the rain 

2. Eleven o' clock ! the lit ■ 

3. Twelve o' clock ! and in 

4. One o' clock ! methinks 



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begins to fall, And Nel - lie 

tie broth - ers wait. Still hop - ing 

the for - est wild. What ter - rors 

I hear a voice, With tid - ings 

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still 
her 
rule 
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from home ! 
re - turn; 
the hour! 
its tone ! 



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lov - ing name 
lat - tice of 
foes surround 
trembling heart 

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the gate, 
the child, 
re - joice, 


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dis - cern. 
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it known ? 


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Can it 


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she wan - ders from the street, Thro' the wood 


to find her lone - ly wav, 




Wea - rv 


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they turn them to the door, While their tears, 


for lips that now are dumb, 




Storms to 


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and tor - rents to be cross'd. Beasts of prey 


that in the darkness roam ; 


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that midnight ech - o stirr'd, Sure - ly, too, 


it bears a joy - ful sound: 






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NELLIE LOST AND FOUND. Concluded. 



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Bless the child ! I fear her lit - tie feet Have car - ried her a - stray. 

Ask the ques - tion oft - en asked be - fore, Oh! moth-er, will she come? 

Would to God that on - ly I were lost, And Nel - lie safe at home ! 

Praise the Lord! a mother's prayer is heard, The dar - ling one is found! 



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Who shall sleep when from the moth - er's fold One lit - tie lamb is gone? 
Praise the Lord ! a moth - er's prayer is heard, The dar - ling one is found. 



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GOD'S WORLD IS BATHED IN BEAUTY. 

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1. God's world is bathed in beauty, God's world is steeped in light; It is the self-same glo - ry That 

2. Hid in earth's mines of sil - ver, Floating in clouds a - bove, — Kinging in Autumn's tempest, Mur- 







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mured by ev - ery dove, — One thought fills God's ere - a - tion, His own great name of Love 



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3 In God's world Strength is lovely, 
And so is Beauty strong, 

And Light — God's glorious shadow- 
To both great gifts belong; 

And they all melt into sweetness, 
And fill the earth with song. 

Genth Wnr<is by 1Ilss PROCTER. 



Above God's world bends Heaven, 
With day's kiss pure and bright, 

Or folds her still more fondly 
In the tender shade of night; 

And she casts back heaven's sweetness 
In fragrant love and light. 

ECHOES. 



God's world has one great echo ; 

Whether calm blue mists are curled, 
Or lingering dew-drops quiver, 

Or red storms are unfurled ; 
The same deep love is throbbing 

Thro' the great heart of God s world. 




H. K. 






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1. Still the an - gel stars are shining, Still the rippling waters flow, But the an - gel voice is silent 



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ECHOES. Concluded. 




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2 Still the wood is dim and lonely, 
Still the plashing fountains play, 
But the past and all its beauty, 
Whither has it fled away ? 
Hark ! the mouuful echoes say, 
Fled away ! 

Words by PERCITAL. 
Walt: time. 



Still the bird of night complaineth 
(Now indeed her song is pain,) 

Visions of my happy hours, 
Do I call, and call in vain ? 
Hark ! the echoes cry again, 
All in vain ! 

MUSIC AND DANCES. 



Cease, O echoes, mournful echoes ! 

Once I loved your voices well ; 
Now my heart is sick and weary — 

Days of old a long farewell ! 

Hark ! the echoes sad and dreary 
Cry farewell, farewell ! 

n. k. 



waltz time. . . | .. . •. . . , . 

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1, Music and dances. Smiles and bright glances, Love's happy chances. All are at play; Y 

2. Viols are tinkling, Light feet are twinkling, Snowy veils crinkling. Round as they go ; 



ouths with gav sashes, Girls with ca- 
Soft voices prattle, Castanets 




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lashes, Quick as light flashes, Foot it a - way. 
rattle, Love's mimic bat tie, Mingles them so. 



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3. 

Now the dance closes, — 
Baskets of roses, 
Woven in posies, 

Gaily they twine. 
Goblets are clashing, 
Amber lights flashing, 
Young lovers dashing 

Beauty in view. 



4. 
All now is over, — 
White mantles hover, 
Each with a lover, 

Back to the town. 
None of them misses 
Sweetest of blisses, 
Dewy wet kisses, — 

That is love's crown. 



98 Words by Miss A. A. PROCTER 
With great expression. 

1. Starry Crowns of Heaven, Set in a 

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lit - tie Ere you hide your light: — 



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2. Snow-flakes pure and spotless, 

Still, O, still remain, 
Binding dreary winter 

In your silver chain: — 
Nay; but melt at once and bring 

Radiant sunny Spring ! 



3. Blossoms, gentle blossoms, 

Do not wither yet; 
Still for you the sun shines, 

Still the dews are wet: — 
Nay; but fade and wither fast, 

Fruit must come at last ! 



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4. Joy, so true aud tender, 
Dare you not abide ? 

Will you spread your pinions, 
Must you leave our side ? — 

Nay; an Angel's shining grace 
Waits to fil 1 ™ ur place 1 



Words by PEKCIVAL. 

Gently. 



SOFTLY SWEET. 



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Soft - ly sweet the song is steal - ing, soft - ly thro' the night a - far; 
Faint and low the bell is peal - ing; dim thro' haze, the light of star; 







5J. O. that song, so softkv breathing, how it flows into my soul 
Memory then her twine unwreathiiur, tears of young emotion 

roll: J " 

And, as far the kaell is tolling, how my spirit floats away. 
Over years, like billows, rolling, to the scenes where youth 

uas cav ! 



3. But the night, so hushed around me, and the sky so dim above. 
In a lonely trance have bound me, trance of mingled grief and 

love, 
Still an early fondness dwelling, faded bloom of vernal years; 
All I hear, the sigh faint swelling ; all I feel, my trickling 

i tears. 



100 Words by TENNYSON. 
Largo. 



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BREAK, BREAK, BREAK. 

Andante. 



H. KINGSBUR7. 



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Break, break, break, on thy cold gray stones, oh Sea ! And I would that my tongue could utter 






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The thoughts that arise in me. 



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Oh well for the fisherman's boy That he shouts to his 

Oh well for the fisherman's boy 

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Oh well for the sail-or lad That he sings in his boat on the bay ! 

Oh well for the sailor lad, 



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to his sister at play, Oh well for the sail-or lad That he sings in his boat ovj the bay! 



Andante. 



BREAK, BREAK, BREAK. Concluded. 

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101 



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And the state - ly ships go on To the ha - ven under the hill ; But oh for the touch of a 

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Sea ! But the ten - der grace of a day that is dead Will nev-er come back to me. 
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102 




KINDNESS. 

3 



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1. As o - ver the earth I wand'ring go, With kind - nesa conquering wrong, " 

2. O strange the power that kindness brings, All creatures it can move, 

3. How sweet in wood and field to know, That countless friends are near, 

4. No fear in the woods when I go by, No terror my face to meet 




Still in my 

And they're the 

And feel that, 

But bright -eyed 

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ear is humming low, This verse of ol - den song : 
tru-est queens and kings, Who rule the world by love, 
where - so - e'er we go, All na - ture holds us dear, 
wood - birds near-er fly, To flutter a - bout my feet. 

IS 

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Je»< /!// things both great and small. For the dear God that lor - eth us. He made and luv-eth a//." 

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The squirrel that lives in the old oak-tree, 
And chatters from morn to night, 

Sits dropping his nutshells down to me, 
With never » thought of flight. "He,&.c. 



6. i 7. 

The sparrow that twitters from lifub tolimb O shame on the murderous snare and gun, 

Throws mischievous looks at me, I And the cruel hands that kill, 

Right well he knows that I love him, Long life to the songsters every one, 

Audbonuiegood friends are.we."i/e.&.c.| That the woods with music till ! "iTe, &.& 



E. R. SILL. 

Modcrato. 



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loving friends, with whom we've led This joyous life so quickly sped, Soon from these walls will 
O guiding hands, to which we cling, The years your lonely hours will bring, When round your knees no 



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speedeth on, and hearts grow old, O 
come the years ye can-not know, 
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V V l V v V 

love, love well ! Ere life is lone, and hearts are cold, 
love, love well ! Make sweet the moments as they go ! 

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O gentle hearts, still day by day, 
We tread tlie wisely pointed way, 
Hut soon our wand'ring steps shall fare, 
Unguided by this tender care. 

O love, love well ! 
Ere 'tis too late our thanks to prove, 

O love, love well ! 
Love asks no recompense but love ! 



v v • 

So, mindful of the parting hour, 
Each field and forest, brook and flower, 
Yea, even the fair old earth, to all 
Seem sadly, tenderly to call, 

O love, love well! 
Whatever fairer future come, 

O love, love well ! 
Old friends, old memories, aud home ! 



104 



Alhprelto 



E. R. SILL. 



TRUTH. 



Arr. from KUECKEN. 






1. Fairest grace our souls in - her - it, Truth ! O be thy presence near, Like a fountain in the 










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sway each thought control; 



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2 'Tis the lily of the garden, 

Spotless in its petals white ; 
'Tis the purest star of Even, 

Burning on the azure night. 
Clear as snow, and calm as summer, 

Dewy fresh as morning light, 
Is the heart where truth, the angel, 

Sitteth clothed in heauty bright. 



3 Hast thou erred? confess it frankly ! 
Wronged thy friend ? O hide it not ! 
Dark concealment moulds anil cankers, 

Sunny truth will cleanse the spot: 
Storms may come, and clouds may gather, 

Till our troubles fall like rain, 
Truth, the bright and sunny weather 
Makes the world all fair again. 



V n*l is i 9 p • f 

4 Flowers but wither in the darkness, 

There all shapes of evil hide, 
Give the soul Truth's air and sunshine 

With her windows standing wide ! 
Love can never bud and blossom, 

Friendship never perfect be, 
Till each heart to each is open 

As the starlisrht to the sea ! 



Words by G. H. CLARK 
With varied expression 



THE RAIL. 



H.K. 105 




1. I met him in the cars, Where resigned- ly he sat; His hair was full of dust, And 

2. The conductor touched his arm, And awoke him from a nap; When he gave the feeding flies Anad- 

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so was his era - vat; He was furth-er- more embellished By a ticket in his hat. 
mon - i - to - ry slap. And his tick - et to the man In the yellow - lettered cap. 

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3 The heads of many men 

Were bobbing as in sleep, 
And many babies lifted 

Their voices up to weep; 
While the coal-dust darkly fell 

On the bonnets in a heap. 

4 When suddenly a jar, 

And a thrice repeated bump, 
Made the people in alarm 

From their easy cushions jump; 
For they deemed the sounds to be 

The inevitable trunip. 



5 A splintering crash below, 

A doom-foreboding twitch. 
As the tender gave a lurch 

Beyond the flying switch — 
And a mangled mass of men 

Lay writhing in the ditch. 

6 With a palpitating heart 

My friend essayed to rise; 
There were bruises on his limbs, 

And stars before his eyes, 
And his face was of the hue 

Of the dolphin when it dies. 



7 I was very well content 

In escaping with my life; 
But my mutilated friend 

Commenced a legal strife — 
Being thereunto incited 

By his lawyer and his wife. 

8 And he writes me the result 

In his quiet way as follows: 
That his case came up before 

A bench of legal scholars, 
Who awarded him his claim 

Of 11500. 



106 



E. R. SILL. 



THE DATS OF YORE. 



Arr. from KUECKEN. 



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the good old times of sto - ry, 

the good old times so splen - did, 

the good new times we're liv - ing, 

M « 



Man - y cen - tu - ries a - go, Man - y 
Had a dark - er side to show, Had a 
In our bless - ed coun - try here, In our 



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cen - tu - ries a - go, There were gal - lant deeds whose glo 
dark - er side to show, And, thank Heaven ! their days are end 
bless - ed coun - try here, And the gold - en years are giv 

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ed — All their wick - ed- 
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know;.. Plumes were toss - ing on the air. Swords were flash - ing in the 
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cheer;.. There is lib - er - ty for all, Not a man need bow the 



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THE DAYS OF YORE. Concluded. 



107 



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sun, Knights in gold - en 
stain, And 'twas ova - el 
knee, Fled are ty - ran 



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work they made, Heaps of 

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men like ti - gers 
hu - man soul is 



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won. O, 'tis won - der - ful to hear, and to tell the glo - ries o'er, Of those 

slain. O, 'tis well we have the hate and the sav - age wrongs no more, Of those 

free ! 0, the good new times have come, and the gloom - y night is o'er, Of those 




brave old days of 
fierce old days of 
dark old days of 



yore, 
yore, 
yore, 



Of those brave old days of 

Of those fierce old days of 

Of those dark old days of 



yore ! 
yore ! 
yore! 



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SWEETEN YOUR TOIL WITH A SONG. 




1. When up to the tern - pie of knowledge 

2. Be cheer - ful, what - ev - er may vex you, 

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youth, Or gath - er in school or in col - lege, The treasures of wisdom and truth ; The 
Ions, The cares that annoy and per - plex you Will fly at the sound of a song ; The 

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SWEETEN YOUR TOIL WITH A SONG. Concluded. 



109 




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way to a spir - it re - pin - ing, 
heart and the hand may be wea - ry, 



But sweet - en your toil with a 
But sweet - en your toil with a 



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Believe it, that sighing and sadness 

Are weights that encumber at best, 
But songs, and a season of gladness 

Are wings to the spirit oppressed : 
The youth who to honor have risen 

Ne'er needed the spur and the thong, 
As though they were bound to a prison, 

But sweetened their toil with a song. 



Away then with frowning and pouting, 

Like heroes press on to the goal ; 
Be hopeful — for fearing and doubting 

Are clogs to the wings of the soul : 
Be patiently daring and doing, 

Success will reward you ere long, 
The good and the true be pursuing, 

And sweeten your toil with a song. 



Words by PERCIVAL. 



A VISION. 



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1. "Whence dost thou come to me, Sweetest of vis - ions, Filling my slumbers with ho - li - est joy?" 



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a. 3. 4. 

"Kindly I bring to thee "Wiry dost thou steal from me — "Life thou must struggle thro' : 

Feelings of childhood, Ever as slumber Strive, -and in slumber [soul." 

That in thy dreams thou be happy awhile. " Flies, and reality chills me again ?" Sweetly again I will steal to thy 



110 



THE MONET-KING. 




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1. In this land of milk and ho - ney, Fair- est land beneath the sky; "Money, money, 
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2 To the shrine of mammon pressing, 
Countless devotees behold; 
Never heeding, hardly guessing 

What's the price of gold. 
Health, and strength, and reputation, 

Body, soul, and all are sold 
By the universal nation, 
To secure the gold. 



3 But the soul of man, immortal, 

Thirsts for knowledge, truth and love 
Sighs for wealth within the portal 

Of the home above. 
Offer gold in untold measure 

To the soul of noble birth, 
Still it yearns for purer treasure 

Than the dust of earth. 



n — r~t?" v 

He is wise, who. freely using 

Wealth to lessen human ill. 
Learns its worth,— and by diffusing, 

Daily prospers si ill ; 
Never in his heart enthrones it, 

There to worship and adore ; 
Consecrates to Him who owns it, 

All his goldeu store. 



Words by E. R. SILL. 

Gently. 



THE CUCKOO. 



Arranged 



111 




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Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, ouckoo, cuckoo. 




2 At morn the forest dells are bright, 

With slanted beams of gold, 
At eve the dim and dewy air 

The growing shades enfold: 
But morn and eve, repeated slow, 

The voice is calling, soft and low, 
Cuckoo, &c. 

3 The pine is fragrant under foot, 

And sweet the spicy air, 
But still that distant voice allures 

To seek it everywhere; 
Now louder, then far-off and low, 

What means it, ever calling so. 
Cuckoo, &c. 



4 Still distant and unseen, the voice 

Some happy spirit seems, 
That beckons us to fairy-land, 

Whose realms we see in dreams, 
Where never mortal steps may go, 

Unless it leads them, calling so, 
Cuckoo, &c. 

5 It is the spirit of the woods, 

That sings, in happy rest, 
Such quiet and contented notes, 

As suit the forest best: 
Its peaceful shades no sound should know, 

But that sweet song so soft and low, 
Cuckoo. &c. 



BEAUTIFUL MORNING. 



A. A. G. 






1. Casting a - side the mantle of night, Earth in her beauty gladdens the sight; Dew-drops like gems the 

2. Streamlet and riv - er, val - ley and plain, Robed in the sunlight, charm us again; Music resounds from 

3. Nerv'd for the cares and toils of the day, Let us to la - bor hasten away; Sowers and reapers 

4. Now in life's morning do all you can, Cheerfully toil, and hopefully plan; Grace with good deeds your 

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loud - ly de - mand Help from the heart, and help 

beau - ti - ful morn, Joy shall be yours tho' wea - 

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2. 'Tis noon: Blue rise the hills be - fore me; Pure swells the a-zure o'er me; And radiant blossoms 



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Gay clouds, like curtains, lie 
Athwart the golden sky ; 
The wind goes whispering by, 
Like soothing voice from heaven. 

4 Tis night : 

The world how hushed and still ! 
Dim towers the shadowy hill ; 
Earth's guardian spirits fill 
Their urns with holy light- 



114 



MORNING HFMN. 

h N 



H. K. 
From '* Happt VoIOIB," by permission. 




1. The morning, the bright and the beau-ti - ful morning Is up, and the sunshine is all on the 

2. And we too a -wake, for our heaven- ly Father, Who soothed us so gent ly to sleep on his 

3. Then away to the school in the sweet summer morning, God's blessing up -on us, his light on our 



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wing, With its fresh flush of gladness the landscape adorning — A gladness which nothing but morning can 
breast, And made the soft stillness of evening to gather Around us, now calls us a - gain from our 
road, And let all the les-sons we're hap-pi - ly learning, Be on- ly to bring us more surely to 



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bring. The earth it a - wak-ing, the sky and the ocean, The riv - er and for - est, the mountain and 
rest. But ere to our studies and du - ties re-turning, We hast-en to give him the praise that is 
God. Oh now let us haste to our heaven - lv Father, And ere the fair skies of life's dawning be 






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115 



plain; The cit-y is stirring its living commotion, And the pulse of the world is reviving a-gain. 
meet, And in solemn devotion the first honrs of morning, Our freest and freshest, we lay at his feet, 
dim, Let us come with glad hearts, let us come altogether, And the morn of our youth let us hallow to him. 



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GOOD MORNING 

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uicai, wel-come, beau-ti-ful, beauti-ful morning, beautiful morning, welcome, welcome here. 

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•J Good morning! good morning ! the night was long and dim, 
Silent and lonely, dark and grim; 
Hui now we come together with songs of merry cheer, 
Welcome, beautiful mot nine! welcome, welcome here. 



- ing, 

3 Good morning! good morning! our hearts are glad and gay, 
Kind night has dreamed their hurts away. 
With love to one another.and trust without a fear. 
Welcome, beautiful moruiug, welcome, welcome here I 



110 From F.APP* Voices, by per. 



AWAY TO THE WOODS. 




young hearts beguiling, Oh we will be hap-py to - day. 
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a - way, a - way, 



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A - way to the woods, a - way to tbe woods, A - 



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2. || : Our flag to the breezes fling, :|| Cho. — Away, away, away, away, 3. ||:Oh this is our festal day. 



And as it waves o'er us, 
We '11 join in the chorns, 
Till woodland and valley shall ring. 



Away to the woods, away; 

Away, away, away, away; 
Away to the woods, away. 



SwoH flowerets are springing, 
Sweet songsters are singing, 
And we will be happy and gay. 



EVENING SONG. 



A. A. O. 



117 




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1. The cares and burdens of the day, No more oppress and wound me; 

2. The bleating flock, the low-ing herd The sheltered fold en - clos - es; 

3. My Father, 'neath thy sheltering wing Se -cure from mo- les - ta - tion, 

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For even-ing in her 
While on her nest, the 
I'll rest 'till morning 




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so - ber grey, Her man - tie wraps a-round me. The bus - y hum of earth is o'er, I 

tune - ful bird With fold - ed wing re - pos - es. The wear - y spir - it finds re - lief From 

light shall bring An - oth - er day's pro-ba - tion : Then ris - ing, heart and hand em-ploy In 



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hear its wild com-mo-tion As gen - tie waves up-on the shore Of some far dis-tant o - cean. 
burdens that en-cnm-ber, E'en sorrow dries the tear of grief, And sol - ace finds in slumber, 
ev - 'ry high en-deav-or, And through the new-born day enjoy The sunshine of thy fav - or. 






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With expression. 



EVENING HYMN. 



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1. See, day-light is fad-ing o'er earth and o'er ocean, The sun has gone down oa the far distant sea; Oh 

2. And oft as the tumult of life's heaving billow Shall toss our frail bark, driving wild o'er night's deep, Let 



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now in the hush of the fit - ful commotion, We lift our tired spirits, blest Saviour to thee. Full 
thy healing wing be stretched over our pillow, And guard us from evil, tho'Death watch our sleep. To 



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oft wast thou praying a-lone 011 the mountain, As eventide spread her dark wing o'er the wave; Thou 
God, our great Father, whose throne isin heaven, Who dwells with the lowly and humble in heart, To the 



EVENING HYMN. Concluded. 



119 




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Son of the Highest, and life's endless Fountain, Be with us, we pray thee, to bless and to save. 
Son and the Spir - it all glo - ry be giv - en; One God, ev-er bless - ed and prais - ed, thou art. 




COME, SOFT AND LOVELY EVENING. 



Arr from E. WIEBE. 




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1. "Come, soft and love - ly 



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2. " See, how the clouds are weaving 
A rich and golden chain, 
See, how the darkened shadows 
Kxtend along the plain " 



. " All nature now is silent, 

Except the passing breeze, 
And birds their night-song warbling 
Among the dewy trees." 



4. "Sweet Evening, thou art with us, 
So tranquil, mild, and still, 
Thou dost our thankful bosoms 
With humble craises fill." 



120 E. R. SILL 

Andante con moto. 



GOOD NIGHT. 



Arr. from GRABEK HOFFMAN. 




1. The ro - sy tints are fa - ding A - long the dark'ning west, The birds are winging homeward, In 



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2 Day shut6 its sunny petals, 

When dewy night comes on, 
But in its bud is folded 

The blossom of a dawn ; 
To every evening's shadow 

There somes a morrow bright, 
Soon will it be " Good morning," 
Where now we sajr "Good night ! 



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3 O sweet, when toil is ended, 

And labor all is done, 
The quiet hour that bringeth 

Kest for each weary one ; 
And sweet to watch the heavens, 

Where all the stars are bright, 
And thro' the hush and shadow 

To hear the soft " Good night !" 



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4 While over us is brooding 

The gentle wing of sleep, 
Fair angels round about us 

Their kindly watch shall keep ; 
And still our peaceful slumber 

Shall be with visions bright, 
For in our dreams will echo 

The sweet " Good night, goodnight." 



E. R. SILL. 



GREETING SONG. 



121 



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alto Hap - py greet, happy, mer- ry meet we. alto. Laughing light, laughing, beaming 

1. Hap - py greet wo, mer - ry meet we, In the freshness of morning, Laughing light-ly, beaming 



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2 Cheery hearts and smiling faces 
Are the glory of living, 
Ever trusting, ever hoping. 

Make the darkest moment gay ; 

fl: Till the days are all sunshine, 
As they hasten a war ! :" 



3 Patient working, ne'er despairing, 
Brings the wisdom we're seeking, 
Golden sheaves and richer fruitage, 
At our feet the moments lay ; 

||: And the years gather harvest, 
As they hasten away ! :|| 



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4 Thro' the sun and silver starlight, 
Floweth onward Life's river, 
Gentle thoughts and kind affections 
On its banks like angels stray ; 
: And the river runs sparkling, 
As it hastens away ! :|J 



E. R. SILL. 



122 

„ ^? Andanlino. 



PARTING SONG. 










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speak - ing. Love, regret, forgive-ness, cheer ; Half M I lore.] thee," half " God speed thee," Eager (or the future 

Love, regret, forgiveness, cheer, Half "I loved thee," half "Godspeed thee, "Eager for the future 

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PARTING SONG. Concluded 



123 



2 Sadly, as we gaze behind us, 

Dream we of the pleasures past, 
Sunny Morn and quiet Even, — 

Joyous hours, ye fled too fast ! 
Not for us, but still for others 

Buds will brighten into flowers, 
Clouds will shade, and stars will glitter, 

Mirth and music speed the hours. 



MEMORY. 



Gaily now we meet the future, 

As the wings of time sweep by, 
Fields as fair are spread before us, 

Stars as bright are in the sky. 
Many a gleam, and many a glory 

Whispering hopes prophetic tell, 
Joys may fade, but love shall linger 

Faithful, though we say farewell ! 

H. K. 
From the " New Songs ot Zion," by permission. 



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1. When shall we meet a - gain- 



Meet ne'ertosever? When shall peace wreathe her chain Eound us forever? 




Our hearts will ne'er repose. Safe from each blast that blows, In 
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When shall love freely flow, 

Pure as life's river ? 
When shall sweet friendship 

Changeless for ever ? 
Where joys celestial thrill, 
Where bliss each heart shall 
And fears of parting chill — 
Never — no. never. 



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Up to that world of light 
Take us, dear Saviour; 
May we all there unite, 

Happy for ever; 
Where kindred spirits dwell, 
There may our music swell, 
And time our joys dispel — 
Never — no, never. 



Soon shall we meet again — 
Meet, ne'er to sever; 

Soon will peace wreathe her chain 
Round us forever: 

Our hearts will then repose 

Secure from worldly foes; 

Our songs of praise shall close- 
Never — no. never. 



124 



SLEEP, GENTLE SISTER. 



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1. Robed in the gar - merits of the tomb, Sweet, gen - tie sis - ter, be thy rest : 

2. Death's pal - lid sig - net marks the brow, Hushed is the voice that charmed the ear, 

3. Death for our sis - ter had no sting, Christ was her re - fuge and her stay, 

4. Oft at the pla - cid eve - ning hour, Pen - sive we'll gath - er 'round thy bed, 

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Beams the bright eye no longer 
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Room for the beau-ti - ful and blest. Sleep, gentle sis 
Tear can no long - er answer tear. 
Calmly she breathed her life a-way. 
Emblem of youth and beauty fled. 

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OUR FESTAL DAY. 



125 




l. Gay anil blooming; childhood. Like the summer flowers. Now for grove and wildwood, And the happy hours; Come and take your 
3. Birds are gaily singing, And the woods resound. Blooming Sowers are flinging; Fragrance all a - round. Silver rills are 



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pla - ces, Clad in neat ar • ray, Come with sunny faces, "Tis our fes -tal day. Hail then, hail the happy, happy day, 
dauc -ing Thro' the meadows green. Nature all entrancing Smiles upon the scene. 



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Hail then, hail the happy, happy day. Hail then, hail the happy, happy day. To the grove audwildwood, come O come away 






3 Discontent and sadness. Your departure take, 
liaise the song? of gladness, Till the echoes wake, 
Sing, O happy childhood, Lift the voice on high, 
Shout till hill arid wildwood Merrily reply. Clio. 



4 Praise the heavenly Father, Praise him for the school, 
Where the children gather, Bright and beautiful, 
Praise him for each blessing, Given us in love. 
And be onward pressing To the School above. Cho 



i26 



THE CHRISTMAS TREE. 



Rev. A. A. GRALEY. 



t>$ permission of the Publisher C. M Tremaihi. 



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1. Of all the treesin the woods and fields, There's none like the Christmas tree: Tho' rich and rare is the 

2. When wintry winds thro' the forests sweep, And snow robes the leafless limb; When cold and still is the 

3. There's golden fruit on the Christmas tree, And gems for the fair and gay, The lettered page for the 



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fruit he yields, The strangest of trees is 
ice-bound deep, this is the time for 
mind bears he, And robes for the win - try 



he: Some drink their fill from the shower or rill, No 
him. Be - neath the dome of the sun- ny home, He 
day: And there are toys for the girls and boys; And 



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cooling draught needs he ; Some bend and break, when the storms awake, But they reach not the Christmas 
stands with all his charms ;'Mid laugh and song from the youthful throng As they gaze on his fruit-1'ul 
eyes that 3'ears be - dim Grow strangely bright with a youthful light, As they pluck from the pendant 



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THE CHRISTMAS TREE. Concluded. 

CHORUS. 



127 






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tree, But they reach not the Christmas tree, 
arms, As they gaze on his fruit - ful arms, 
limb, As they pluck from the pend - ant limb. 



Tis a mer-ry, mer-ry time, 'tis a 



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Let others sing of the deep blue sea, 

Or choose for their theme the land ; 
We'll sing the praise of the Christmas tree, 

The joy of the household band: 
When summer's fled, and the year is dead, 

Our hearts shall fondly clin^', 
From care set free 'round the Christmas tree, 

While the home with his praise shall ring. Cho. 



128 



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SANTA CLAUS. a.a.g. 

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1. Old San - ta Claus ceas - es to urge a - long His fleet - foot - ed steeds with the 

2. At midnight, when childhood in slum - ber seems To gath - er sweet flowers from the 

3. On tip - toe he stands on the peace - ful spot, Where childhood re - pos - es in 



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Well lad - en with treasures from store and shop, He hitches his team to the 
Then on to the roof of the house he'll hop, And sly - ly descend from the 
He fills up the. stocking, he crams the sock, With candies and toys for the 



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people by night; And 


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nev - er was king with his throne and crown, As merry as he when the sun goes down. 


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4 His favors nil scattered, he hastens back 
The way that he came, — up the sooty track; 
And never his mission of love shall stop, 
While there is a home with a chimney top. Cho. 

5 Now, busy as bees in their honied hives, 
The little folks gather when morn arrives; 



The merry eye sparkles, the sweet voice rings, 
As stockings are searched for the wondrous things. 

Cho. 
6 They wonder, when bringing his dainty freight, 
He never comes in by the door or gate; 
And hope he will never be forced to stop, 
And die in the smoke of the chimney top. 



LITTLE THINGS. 






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I. Scorn not the slightest word or deed. Nor deem it void of power: There's fruit in each wind- wafted seed. Waiting its natal hour. 







2 A whispered word may touch the heart, 
And call it back to life', 
A look of love bid sin depart, 
And still unholy strife. 



3 No act falls fruitless; none can tell 
How vast its power may be: 
Nor what results enfolded dwell 
Within it silently. 



130 



THE OLD YEAR. 



Music by A. A. G. 






1. The midnight bells are trowling. The wintry winds are howling, The cliff-beat surge is growling In thunders far a - 

2. Heap up the fire more cheerly — We'll hail the New Year early , The old one has gone fairly — A right good year and 

3. Here comes the New Year duly, We'll give him welcome truly, Comemark the score up newly — Time flies apace a- 



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way ; And heaven and ea/thare sighing, And drear - i - ly re - ply - ing, "The Old Year lies a - dy - ing, Old 
true ! We've had some pleasant rambles, And merry Christmas gambols, And ros - es without brambles, A - 
way ! Let's meet him like a lov- er, His brow with chaplets cover — When his reign, too, is o - ver, " Good- 



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Year, good-bye!" they say. Old Year, good-bye, Old Year.good-bve.Old Year.good-bye they say. And heaven and earth are 
dieu, Old Year, A - ilieu ! A - dieu, Old Year, A - dieu, Old Year. A. dieit. Old Year, A- dieu ! We've had some pleasant 
bye, Old Year," we'll say. 'Good-bye, OldYear, Good-bye, OldYear.Good-bye, Old Year," we'll say. Let's meet him like a 



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THE OLD YEAR. Concluded. 



131 




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sighing, And drear-i - ly re - ply- injr " The Old Year lies a - dy - ing, Old Tear, good-bye!'' they say. 
rambles, And merry Christmas gambols, And ros • es with ■ out brambles, A - dieu. Old Year, A - dieu ' 
lov - er. His brow with chaplets cover, When his reign, too. is ov • er. "Good-bye, Old Year," we'll say. 



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BEAR HIM TO AN EARLY TOMB. 



Rev. A. A. GRALEY. 






1. Bear him to an early tomb ,Loving ones no more embrace him : Fallen in his youthful bloom, On earth's bosom gently place him. 

2. Mouru ye not a brother lost, Hushed the storm his spirit tossed, 

God. who gave him, has recalled him; Loosed the bonds that oft enthralled him. 

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Weep no more, Weep no more, Happy on the peaceful shore, Alibis pains and tears are o'er, Weep no more. Weep no more 
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3. Brief life's battle-field he trod, 4. In the better life he lives. 5. Bear him to bis earthy bed, 

Brief the conflict raged around him; Lives forever and forever; Spread the grassy mantle o'er him; 

Fighting ill the cause of God Perfect is the love he gives, Leave him sleeping there, not dead. 

There, death sought, and ready found Perfect is each high endeavor. Cho. Sleeping 'till the morn restore him. Cho 
him. Oho. 



132 



From Happy Voices, by per. 



PILGRIM SOKG. ( For the Close of tiie Year.) 

H. KINGSBURY. 




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1. A few more years shall roll, A few more seasons come, And we shall be with those that rest, Asleep within the tomb. 



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Then, O my Lord, pr< pare My soul for that great day; Oh wash me in thy precious blood, And take my .sins away 
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Then, O my Lord, prepare 
My soul for that calm day; 

Oh wash me in thy precious blood, 
And take my sins away. 

4. A few more struggles here, 
A few more partings o'er, 

A few more toils, a few more tears, 
And we shall weep no more. 

Then, O my Lord, prepare 
My soul for that blest day; 

Oh wash me in thy precious blood, 
And take my sins away. 

5. A few more Sabbaths here 
Shall cheer us on our way; 



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2. A few more suns shall set 
O'er these dark hills of time; 

And we shall be where suns are 
not, 

A far serener clime- 
Then, O my Lord, prepare 

My soul for that blest day; 
Oh wash me in thy precious blood, 

And take my sins away. 

3. A few more storms shall beat 
On this wild rocky shore; 

And we shall be where tempests 
cease, 
And surges swell no more. 



And we shall reach the endless rest. 

The eternal Sabbath-day. 
Then, O my Lord, prepare 

My soul for that sweet day; 
Oh wash me in thy precious blood, 

And take my sins away. 

6. 'T is but a little while 

And He shall come again, 
Who died that we might live, who lives 

That we with Him may reign. 
Then, O my Lord, prepare 

My soul for that glad day ; 
Oh wash me in thy precious blood. 

And take my sins away. bonab. 



frciiu Happy Voices b} |>er. 



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SHALL WE MEET BEYOND THE RIVER J 



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Shall we meet 



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bor When our storm-y voyage is o'er 



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Shall we meet, 



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shall we meet, shall, etc. 




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3. Where the music of the ransomed 4. Shall we meet with many a loved one, 5. Shall we meet with Christ our Saviour 
Rolls in harmony around, Torn on earth from our embrace? When he comes to claim his own? 

And creation swells the chorus Shall we listen to their voices, Shall we hear him bid us welcome, 

With its sweet melodious sound ? And behold them face to face ? And sit down upon his throne ? 



134 



FATHERLAND. 



Maestoso. 



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1. God save our Fatherland ! from shore to shore, God save our Fatherland, one ev - er - more. 

2. Strong in the heaits of men, Love is thy throne; Un - ion and Lib- er - ty crown thee a - lone; 

3. Ride on. proud Ship of State, tho' tempests lower; Ride on in ma - jes- ty, glorious in power; 



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No hand shall per- il it, No strife shall sever it, East, West, and North, and South ! One evermore ! 
Nations have sighed for thee, Our sires have died for thee, We'll all be true to thee — All are thine own. 
Tbo' fierce the blast may be, No wreck shall shatter thee — Storms shall but bring to thee Sunshine oncemor'e ! 



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God save our Fatherland ! true home of Freedom ! God save our Fatherland, one ev 

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One in her hills and streams, One in her glorious dreams, One in love's noblest themes — One evermore ! 



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1. In -to the sunshine, Full of light, Leaping and flashing From morn till night; Into the moonlight, 

2. In - to the starlight, Eushing in spray, Hap-py at midnight — Hap-py by day! Full of a nature 



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Winter than snow, Waving so flower-like, When the winds blow. 
Nothing can tame, Changed every moment — Ev - er the same ! 

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Ceaseless aspiring, 

Ceaseless content, 
Darkness or sunshine 

Thy element; 
Glorious fountain, 

Let my heart be 
Fresh, changeful, constant; 

Upward, like thee I 



136 POPULAR SOVEREIGNTY. A A G 



1. No jeweled crown is on our bead, No scep-tre in our hand, No fawning vassals guard our throne. And 

2. Your coat may be of lex • ture fine, While mine's of coarser thread ; Or you may wield a potent pen, While 




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bow at our command : But, think it not an i - die boast. We yield the palm to none, For here in Freedom's 
1 wield but a spade; And you may bask in fortune's smile, While I must bear hard knocks, But we are sov'reigns 

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wide domain, We're sov'reigus every 
ev - ery one When at the bal - lot 

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For here in Freedom's wide domain. We're sov'reigns eve- ry one. 
But we are sov'reigns ev • ery one When at the bal • lot box. 

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3 The goodly land we rule is ours, 
For every field and flood 
Was purchased by our noble sires 
With toils, and tears, and blood: 
"Tis ours to give away, or sell, 
'Tis ours to plough and bow, 
| And with its teeming harvests feed 
This hungry world below. :|j 



No church is here combined with State 

To rule with iron rule ; 
We boast a better union far. 

And purer — Church and School. 
And should rebellion lift its hand 

To steal our queenly crown, 
: Then with a right good royal will, 

We'll put the traitor down. :|| 



But freemen let us rise above 

The sordid and the base, 
For noble thoughts, and noble deeds 

Become a kingly race : 
We'll purge the land from every wrong 

That weakens while it stings, 
|| : 'Till we shall rule the fairest realm. 
And rei^u the purest kings. :H 




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HOME OF THE BRAYE. 



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1. Land, where thegravesof the martyred dead Tell of the heroes who fought and bled ; Tried by the flood and the 

2. Ty ■ rants in rap ■ ture foretold thy thrall, En -vied thy greatness and bailed thy fall. Mocked at thy tears, and Iby 

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hattleflame, Brighter art thou on the scroll of fame. Home of the brave. Homeof the brave, Homeof the freeman bvit 
wail of woe, When from thy bosom uprose the foe. Strong in the right. Strong in the right, God « as tbv trust thro' the 



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not of the slave, Home of the brave, Home of the brave. Home of the freeman but not of the slave, 
wear - isome night. Strong in the right, Strong in the right, God was thy trust thro' the wear - i • some night. 




Shout, freemen shout, for the strife is o'er, 
Fond hearts have bled, but shall bleed no more : 
Tears ceas> to flow o'er the patriot dead, 
Treason is crushed, and the traitor fled. 

Peace, gentle peace, Peace, gentle peace, 
Gives to the grief-stricken mourner release. 



Brighter and purer thy name shall be, 
Greatness and goodness shall dwell with thee, 
Gone are the wrongs that obscured thy fame, 
Perished and gone in the battle-flame. 

Rise then and shine, Rise then and shino, 
Chastened, but spared by the Father divine. 



] 38 Words by PERCIVAL. 
Majestically. 



HAIL TO THE LAND! 



H. K. 



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1. Hail to the land of the free and the bold, Where honor and justice have planted their throne, Where the 

2. Hail to the land we have cherished so long, The soil where the bright tree of li-berty grows ! May its 



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hearts of the meanest can ne? - er be sold, But or - der and lib - er - ty reign there a - lcne ! 
root deep-er sink, and its branches be strong, While the wave of the o - cean in ma - jes - ty flows ! 

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Hail to the souls that can nev - er be slaves, Who boast of the rights they have won by the sword, Who 
Long may we meet and be glad in its shade, Se - cure from the tempests that madden the world; Its 



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fight for their fore - fathers' al - tars and graves, And soar as the ea - gle who rescued them soured ! 
leaves shall be green, and its flowers nev-er fade, And the starred flag, that tops it, be ev - er un - furled. 

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Hail to the cradle where liberty drew 

The pure air that freemen alone can inhale ! 
Here the crowd never toiled for the gain of the few, 

And the palace ne'er shadowed the cot in the vale; 
We swore on our swords and our hearts to unite, 

Till the chain should be broken, the slave should be free, 
And the hands that are daring in battle for right, 

To welcome as brothers, wherever they be ! 



Hail to the nations, who wake from the sleep 

Of a long night of darkness, like giants from wine, 
To the heroes who rouse in their greatness, and leap 

To gather the laurels on liberty's shrine ! 
Their fetters are broken, their tyrants are fled, 

And the hands of the North and the South shall unite 
To raise, o'er the tombs of the glorious dead, 

A temple of honor, and crown it with light. 



Words by PERCIVAL. 
With swelling expression. 



HARK! THE SONG. 



Rilard. 



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1. Hark! the song Floats along, 

2. O'er the plain Sweeps again 

3. Rock and hill Give it still 

4. Shad-ows fall, — Voic-es call 

5. Daylight flies,- Amber skies, 



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Clear-ly swelling, soft - ly dy-ing, Soft as wind in ros - es sigh-ing. 
Sudden burst of hope and gladness, Trembles then the trill of sad-ness. 
Bright and clear, the sweet emotion, Deep and full, the heart's devotion. 
Fondly home the truant, straying Down the brook in eddies playing. 
O'er the shadowy mountain glowing Dark-en ; yet the song is flowing. • 






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Vivace. 

„ 11 1<1 »»<! 2<! TENORS 

J3ET 



THE CHARGE. (For male voices.) h. kingsbury 



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1. The born and the trumpet are ring-ing a - far, As the summons to bat - tie is sounding; And the 

2. We leap to our saddles, we range us in line, As the voice of the trumpet is call - ing ; O'er the 



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Shrill it echoes a - far 
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" Give the spur to the charge, to the charge, ere the foeman, the foeman is nigh, Rush amain as the forest rings 

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Shrill it echoes 
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THE CHARGE. Continued. 



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peat, repeat, re - peat it a - gain, 
loud, loud, loud with your cry. 



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And the shout of the war - rior, and near - er the song, 
Speed on to the shock, in his mid - way ca-reer, — 

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Peal a - loud as the glittering bands are hurry- ing a - long. 
For our sires were first in fight, they nev-er thought of fear. " 



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pours the tide of fight, 
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a - loft floats the 
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THE CHARGE. Concluded. 



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fierce we rush, And to -gether dash a - main. So on, on, on, on, o'er the sounding plain, 




Still aloft floats the tossing flag, Still aloft floats the tossing flag, In the glance of morning's light. 
To the wild conflict, fierce we rush, To the wild conflict, fierce we rush, And together dash a - main. 



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1. Joy ! Joy ! the long, dark night is past ; The weary way is done ; Bright o'er the mountain, fast Ascends the cheeringsun. 



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2 See! See! 

The well-known hill is nigh ; 

The spiry poplars rise ; 
The hrook is winding by; 

There still my cottage lies. 



3 Hark! Hark! 

What welcome sounds of home ! 

I know their meaning well : 
Far, far my foot may roam, 

Yet deep and strong the spell. 



4 Shout! Shout! 

The goal, the goal is nigh; 

My love is at the door; 
We run, we leap, we fly • 

We meet to part no more' 



THE PATRIOT DEAD AT GETTYSBURG. 



A. A. G. 



143 






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1. They sleep, in glo - ry's bed they sleep, Pierced by the bul - let or the steel, Unmoved a-like by 

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2 The stalwart arm that dealt the blow, 
Or freedoms starry banner bore. 
Shall wield the battle blade no more, 
Nor grapple with the frenzied foe: 
The heart is still that Dover quailed 
At traitor's threat, or foeman'a ire; 
The eye is lustreless and veiled, 
That tlashed v ith patriotic lire. 



3 Here in this consecrated spot 
No cares disturb, no anguish stings; 
The battle cry of freedom ringsy 
The strife goes on ; — they heed it not: 

While mourning robes the household band. 
While bleeds the heart bereaved and lone, 
While sire and matron loud demand 
The loved and lost ; — they slumber on. 



4 Here, if you will the marble raise, 
1 1 ere plant the » illow , strew the flower ; 
But in the nation's heart shall tower 
The monument that speaks their praise. 
Sleep, soldiers, sleep, your neb bequest 
Shall Freedom's gratitude inflame ; 
And Gettysburg shall swell the list 
Of heroes on the scroll of Fame. 



144 Words by R. E. B. MACLELAN. 

With varied expression. 



A VICTORY! 



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ruoth-er sat in thoughtful ease, A - knitting 



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turn the sky All crimson with their glare; Bold mil- sic fills the startled streets With mirth-inspiring 
some than she, That ros - y prattling maid. Sudden her cheek turns ghostly white ; Her eye with fear is 
thrift -y task With hands that never tire. She tore her few gray hairs.and shrieked, "My joy on earth is 

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sound; The gaping cannon's reddening breath Wakes thunder-shouts around ; And thousand joy-ful 
filled, And rushing in - of - doors, she screams — "My brother Willie's killed!" And thousand joy-ful 
done! Oh ! who will lay me in my grave ? Oh, God ! my son, my son!" And thousand joy-ful 

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voic - es cry, "Huz- za ! huz-za! 
voic - es cry, "Huz - za ! &c. 
voic - es cry, "Huz- za ! &c. 

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A youthful wife the threshold crossed, 

With matron's treasure blessed: 
A smiling infant nestling lay 

In slumber at her breast 
She spoke no word, she heaved no sigh, 

The widow's tale to tell; 
But like a corpse, all white and stiff, 

Upon the earth-floor fell. 
And thousand joyful voices cry, 

"Huzza! huzza! a Victory. 1 " 



An old weak man, with head of snow, 

And years threescore and ten, 
Looked in upon his cabin-home, 

And anguish seized him then. 
He help'd not wife, nor helpless babe, 

Matron nor little maid, 
One scalding tear, one choking sob — 

He knelt him down, and pray'd, 
And thousand joyful voices cry, 

"Huzza ! huzza ! a Victory !" 



146 



THE HERO'S ORPHAN GIRLS. 



H. K. 



Voice. Tenderly, and with great expression 



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1. Oh, lady ! buy these budding flowers, For 
2. Oh, buy my flowers ! they're fair and fresh. As 
3. She sleeps within a hollow tree, Her 
4 When we in silence are laid down In 
5. No one has bought of me to-day, And 



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I am cold, and wet, and weary; I gathered them ere break of day, When all was lonely 
mine and morning's tears could keep them, To-morrow's sun will view them dead, And I shall scarcely 
on - ly home — its leaves her bedding; And I've no food to car - ry there, To soothe the tears she 
life's last fearless, blessed sleeping, No tears will dew our humble grave, Save those of pitying 
night-winds now are sad - ly sighing; And I, like these poor drooping flowers, Unnoticed and un- 




THE HERO'S ORPHAN GIRLS. Concluded 



147 




still and dreary ; And long have sought to sell them here. To purchase clothes, and food, and dwelling, For Valor's wretched 
live to h eep them ! Yet this sweet bud, if nursed with care, Soon in - to fullness would lie swelling — And. nurtured by some 
will be shedding ! Oh! that those mourners' gushing griefs — The pastor's prayer, and bell's sad knelling, And that deep grave were 
heaven's on n weeping : Unknown we live — unknown must die — No tongue the mournful tale he telling Of two young, broken- 
wept aindy-ing! My soul is struggling to be free — It loathes its wretched, earthly dwelling ; My limbs re-fuse to 




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orphan girls — Poor me, and my young sis - ter Ellen, 

generous hand. So might my lit - tie sis- ter Ellen, 

meant for me And my poor lit - tie sis • ter Ellen. 

hearted girls — Poor Ma-ry and her sis - ter Ellen, 

hear their load — Oh ! God ! protect my sis - ter Ellen. 



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Gently. 



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1. Gently the riv - er is flowing, On its smooth oceanward way; 

2. Banners no long-er are waving, — Swords flashing bright in the sun — 



Lilies and daisies are 
Pure crystal waters are 



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growing, Fresh on its borders to - dayT 
lav-ing Banks where the battle was won. 

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Rose-tint-ed clouds from the heavens, Kindle a bltish on the 
Grass - es and willows are springing Ov- er the heroes who 






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the sol - diers graves, 
their peaceful watch keep. 



3 Bugles no longer are pealing, 

Shells flying thick in the air; 
Armies in battle-shock reeling. 

Death-groans, and blood, and despair 
But soft-breathing zephyrs from heaven. 

Over the battle-fields play; 
Tranquil as midsummer even, 

"All is quiet" to day. 



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" All is quiet;*' but marbles 

Rising in stately pride. 
Tell of the valiant heroes, 

Who for the country have died. 
Oh, what rich gifts on thine altar, 

Land of the free, have been laid ! 
Who dared to shrink or to falter, 

When such a ransom was paid 7 



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Father! oh grant us submission, 

While we weep over the slain ; 
Give us the blessed fruition 

Of hope they died to attain. 
So shall the nation be holy, 

Hallowed the chastening rod. 
While we inscribe on our banners, 

" Sacred to truth, and to God " 



FREEDOM'S DAT. (For male voices.) 



149 



From " Young Men's Singing Book " by permission. 
1st and 2d tenobs. Alia marcia. 



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Free-dom's aus - pi-cious day, Hail we thy sa - cred ray! Well may onr land re-joice, 

I ST and 2d BAS - 1 t. 



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Tune ev - ery heart and voice, Free-men, u - ni - ted wake ! 



Let one full cho - rus 



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FREEDOM'S DAY. Continued. 



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Fond - - ly we sing of thee, Land of the no - ble free, of the no - ble free, Where 



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FREEDOM'S DAY. Concluded. 



151 



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rest the dead;. 



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Mem - 'ry her tears will shed, will shed Lau- 



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rels of deathless fame, . . Wreath ev - ery he - ro's name, ev - ery he - ro's name. 



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152 



GOD SAYE THE FLAG! 



R. L. 



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1. Washed in the blood of the brave and the blooming, Snatched from the altars of in - soleut foes, Burning with star-fires, but 

2. Vain-ly the prophets of Ba - al would rend it, Vain-ly his worshippers pray for its fall ; Thousands have died for it, 

3. Justiee that reddens the sky with her terrors, Mercy that comes with her white-handed train, Soothing all passions, re- 

4. Borne on the deluge of old u - sur- pa-tions, Drifted our Ark o'er the des - o - late seas ; This was the rainbow of 

5. God bless the Flag and its loy - al defenders, While its broad folds o'er the battle-field wave, Till the dim star-wreath re- 






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nev - er con - sum - mg, 
mill - ions de - fend it, 
deem-ing all er - rors, 
hope to the na • tions, 
kin • die its splendors, 



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Plash its broad rib - ands of li - ly and rose. Raise the flag ! hail the flag! 

Em - blera of jus - tice and mer - cy to all. 

Sheathing the sa - bre and break - ing the chain. 

Torn from the storm - cloud and flung to the breeze ! 

Washed from its stains in the blood of the brave ! 

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Ev - ery hea 

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Lift our voic • es high 



for it ! Bear it to the bat - tie's front, Ev 



cry heart will die for it ! 



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UOD SAVE THE FLAG! Concluded. 



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Lift tbe flag 



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Words by PERCIVAL. 
Majestically. 



LIBERTY. 




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voice 



on our 



hills, And it ech - oes tar at sea : 
glance darts from yon cloud, And it frights thee, tyrant, — thee; 
warn - ing calls at night: "Nations, rouse ye, and be free." 

air, Which we feel, but can not see; 

dore, Builds his throne on land and sea; 

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There's a presence in the 
The God our hearts a 



With a quickening .power it 
But the free - man ris - es 
They hear it with de - 
Ev - ery bos - om gladdens 
He is in the tempest's 




fills Ev -ery heart, and in - ly thrills, -'Tis the voice of Lib 

proud, And his sire stirs in his shroud, -Tia the glance of Lib 

light, But the mon-arch looks a - fright, - 'Tis thy warn - ing, Lib 

there, High to hope and strong to dare, — 'Tis thy pres - ence, Lib 

roar, Or when o - cean laps the shore,- That God, is Lib 



ty, 

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154 Words by E. R. SILL. 
March movement. 



THE FLAW. 



H. KINGSBURY. 



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1. How it gleams on the night of the world ! 'Tis the flag of the dawn, starry bright; And the 

2. From the sword, and the scourge, and the chain, Come the millions that long to be free, From the 



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ends of the earth streaming in, 



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Is the fort - re'ss of free - dom and right. From its 
Like the riv - ers that run to the sea. Let them 



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mountains it rides on the breeze, From its shores it streams out to the sea, And the 
come ! there is room for them all ; Let them come ! to each val - ley and plain ; Let them 



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THE FLAG. 



Concluded. 



155 




wind and the wave sine; in 
come ! till from far western 



• 

joy, For 

shores . . . We 



the flag of 
will peo - pie 



the fair and the free, 
old A - sia a - gain. 



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Then up with the flag, the tried and the true, and hur - rah ! and hnr - rah ! And hur - 



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rah! and hur -rah! And hnr - rah for the rule of 



the red, white and blue, and hur - rah ! 



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Step by step, all together we march, 

And above us the flag is unfurled ; 
Step by step, tramping on to the end, 

Till our freedom shall conquer tlie world. 
Then the tyrant shall fall from the throne, 

And the slave shall leap up from his chain, 
And one flat:, and one right, and one law 

Shall be ruler on mountain and main. Cho. 



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1 Tho' the tempest of war lowered low, 

Where it waved o'er the smoke of the plain, 
Yet the storm only cleared all the air, 

And the sun now is streaming a<;ain. 
Bloom for aye. ye fair lilies of peace! 

All the dark clouds are scattered in flight, 
Kor the sword to k ploughshare is heat, 

And the harvest is garnered iu lhzht! Cho. 



156 




THE FLAG OF THE FREE. 






Rev. A. A. fiRALEY. 




1. Flag of my country, the flag of the free. Beautiful streamer, now dearer to me; Peerless and stainless, tri- 

2. Boast of the sires who bequeathed us a life, Boast of the sons on the red field of strife. Boast of the serf as he 
3 Fled are the foes who thy beauty would mar, Gone not one stripe and effaced not one star, Broken and humbled they 




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nmphant-ly wave, Ov - er a na-tion that knows not a slave. 'Tis the flag that I love, And it 
toils o'er the sea, Hope of the world is the flag of the free, 
turn un - to thee, Sigh-ing for rest 'neath the flag of the free. 



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ever shall be, The pride of the nation, the pride of the nation, the pride of the nation, The flag of the free. 




4. Victors and vanquished are one as of yore, 
War's gory hand shall divide them no more, 
Once they were brothers, and brothers they'll be 
Happy again "neath the flag of the free. Cho. 



Buried the past, they will toil to adorn 
Freedom's domain for a nation unborn. 
And when they fall this their solace shall be. 
Over them floats the dear flag of the free. Cho 



ii ords by E R SILl,. 
Lively. — with varied expression 

N 



THE TRI-COLOR 



Arranged. 157 




1. Oh ! sweet were the 

2. But, hark ! from a - 



summers of peace in the laud, When the pennons of the world flocked like 
far muttered sounds nearer come. And the beating of each heart is the 



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floating o'er the 
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land and the 
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treason in the 


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flag of our fa - thers so val - iant and true, The flag of the free with its red, white and blue ! 
slave, let him flee ! who'll be free, let him fight ! The wrong is in arms, ral-ly all to save the right ! 







3 Oh ! sweet were the summers of peace in the land. 
But more glorious is war, traitor foes to withstand ; 
The flashing of the guns, with their fierce and ruddy hue, 
And the snow of the shrouds of the fallen so true, 
And the smoke of the fight, rr^ke the red, white and blue ! 



Three cheers — hip, hurrah ! hip. hurrah ! hip, hurrah ! 
We have won the day for right, and for light, ami for law ! 
The laurels that are rosy with freedom's sunrise new, 
And white lilies of peace, and the violets' hue 
Round the "raves of the slain, are the red, white and blue' 



158 word. by e.r. sill. NEIGHBOR DOBBS, or " That's quite another tiling. 7 

With varied expression. . 



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1. Here's neighbor Dobbs, says we've got an aw - ful government, The country's lost, and po - li- 

2. And Dobbs, he grumbles at all they do in Washington, And swears he hopes there'll be an- 

3. He thinks John Bull needs a lesson from our Government, And wants our ea - gle to be 

4. He says U.S. have a na - tu - ral right to Mex - i - co, And Cu - ba to our arms by 

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ti - cians have 
oth - er war 



the swing; 

in spring; 
screaming, on the wing; 
force of arms he'd bring; 



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But 
But 
Yet 




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if you ask if hell Put his hand to the wheel. Then 
if a draft came on, And Dobbs's name was drawn, He'd 

when there's tax to pay, Then Dobbs's back's a way, He'd 
once a boy he shot, For tresspass on his lot, But 

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neighbor Dobbs replies, " Oh, that's quite an- oth • 
rath - er thiuk, perhaps, war was quite an - oth - 
have us fight, but paying — that's quite au • oth - 
then, as Dobbs remarked, that was quite au - oth - 



thing 
thing 
thing 
thing 




5 He wants our navy to go and whip Napoleon, 
Aud Yankee Doodle' in the Tuilleries to sing; 

But if he had to go, 
And face a chassepot, 
He'd feel, no doubt, that glory was quite another thing ' 

6 Oh, would that doctors were made to take their me- 

dicine! 
Not half so much to other people's doors they'd bring; 
'Tis all so very nice, 
To give a friend advice, 
But taking it one's self — oh, that's quite another thing ! 



COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN. 159 

By permission of LEE k WALKER. DAVID T SHAW. 

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1. O Co - lum - bia ! the gem of the o - cean, 

2. When war winged its wide des - o - la - tion, 

3. The wine - cup, the wine - cup bring hith-er, 



The home of the brave and the 
And threatened the land to de- 
And fill you it true to the 



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free, The shrine of each patriot's de - vo-tion, 

form, The ark then of freedom's foundation, 

brim ! May the wreaths they have won never wither, 






A world of-fers hom-age to 
Co - lum- bia, rode safe through the 
Nor the star of their glo - ry grow 



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COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN. Continued. 




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thee, 
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Thy man - dates make he - 

With her gar - lands of vict - 

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roes as - sem - ble, 
'ry a - round her, 
ted ne'er sev - er, 



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Lib - er - - ty's form stands in view, 
proudly she bore her brave crew, 

they to their col - ours prove true ! 



Thy banners make ty - ran - ny 

With her flag proud - ly float - ing be • 

The Ar - my and Na - vy for 



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trem - ble, 
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When borne by the red, white and blue. 
The boast of the red, white and blue. 

Three cheers for the red, white and blue. 



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THE BATTLE-CRY OF FREEDOM. Song and Chorns. 



Con Spirito. 



Words and Music by GEO. F. ROOT. By permission. 



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1. Yes, we'll ral - ly round the flag, boys, we'll rally once again, Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom, 

2. We are springing to , the call of our brothers gone before, Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom; 



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We will ral - ly from the hill-side, we'll gather from the plain, Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom. 
And we'll fill the va - cant ranks with a million Freemen more, Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom. 



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THE BATTLE-CRT OF FREEDOM. Concluded. 



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CHORUS— Fortissimo. 



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The Union for-ev - er, Hurrah, boys, Hui'rah ! Down with tiie traitor, Up with the star; While we 






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ral - ly round the flag, boys, ral - ly once a - gain, Shouting the bat - tie - cry of Free - dom. 




We will welcome to our numbers the loyal, true and 
brave, 
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom, 
And although he may be poor, he shall never be a 
slave, 
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom. 
The Union forever, Hurrah, boys, Hurrah ! 
Down with the traitor, Up with the star ; 
While we rally round the flag, boys, rally once again, 
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom. 



So we're springing to the call, from the East and from 
the West, 
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom, 
And we'll hurl the rebel crew from the land we love 
the best, 
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom. 

The Union forever, Hurrah, buys, Hurrrah ! 
Down with the traitor, Up with the star ; 
While we rally round the flag boys, rally once again, 
Shouting the battle-cry of Freedom, 



164 



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1. Oh say can you see by the dawn's ear - ly light, What so proud - ly we 

2. On the shore dim - ly seen thro' the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haugh-ty 

3. Ami where is that band who so vaunt - ing - ly swore That the hav - oc of 

4. Oh ! thus be it ev - er when free - men shall stand Be - - tween their lov'd 






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A home and a coun - try, shall 
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night that our Flag was still there, Oh ! say, does the star - span - gled ban - ner yet 

fleet - ed now shines in the stream, Tis the star - span - gled ban - ner, Oh ! long may it 

flight or the gloom of the grave; And the star - span - gled ban- ner in tri - umph shall 

mot - to, "In God is our trust;" And the star - span - gled ban- ner in tri - umph shall 




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the brave, 

the brave, 

the brave, 

the brave. 



166 



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THE PASTURE. 



7s. 6 lines. 



From " Happt Voices," by permission. 







1. Faithful Shepherd, meek and mild, To thy pastures lead a child, Where the tender ver -dure grows, 
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Where the peaceful streamlet flows, Where thy flock, from danger free, Hear thy voice, and fol-low thee. 






i! There, beneath thy watchful eye, 
They are safe, though thinner's niyh ; 
There enfolded in thy anus, 
They can smile at rude alarms ; 
Though a host their way oppose, 
Thou wilt save them from their foes. 



3 When the vale of grief they tread, 
Thou dost mark the tears they shed; 
By their side in pity stand, 
Dry the tear with tender hand ; 
Gently quell the rising fear, 
Make it sweet to suffer there. 

MORNING PRAYER. 



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Faithful Shepherd, meek and mild, 
To thy pastures lead a child ; 
Weak and helpless, Lord. I am, 
Gather in a wand'ring lamb; 
Lest from thee I further stray, 
Take me to thy fold, I pray. 

From " Happt Voices," by permijeion. 



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1. Our Father in heaven, we hallow thy name ; May thy kingdom ho - ly on earth be the 

2. For - give our transgressions, and teach us to know That humble compassion that par - dons each 



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Concluded. 



167 



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Oh, give to us dai - ly 
Keep us from temptation, 

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our portion of bread, For 'tis from thy bounty that all must be fed. 
from weakness, aud sin, And thine be the glo-ry for - ev - er. A - men 

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ear Je - bus, ev - er 

2. Thy beau -ti - ful and 

3. But I have felt thee 



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shin-ing face I see not, tho' so near 
in my thought, Fighting with sin for me ; 



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The sweetness of thy 

And when my heart loves 



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soft low voice I am to deaf to 
God, I know The sweetness is from 



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And when, dear Saviour, I kneel down, 
Morning and night, to prayer, 

Something there is within my heart 
Which tells me thou art there. 



Yes, when I pray, thou prayest too ; 

Thy prayer is all for me ; 
But when I sleep, thou sleepest not, 

But watchest patiently. 



]68 Words by E. R. SILL. 

1st anb 2d Tenor*. Solemnly 

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PRATER. (For male voices.) 



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atb - er in Heav - en ! humbly 
2. All these Thy mercies show us 
1st and 2d Basses. , i 



be - fore Thee, Kneeling in prayer Thy children appear 
Thy kindness, All this Thy kindness teach - es Thy love; 



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We in our weak - ness, We 
Thy tender mer - cies, Thy 



in our blind - ness, Thou in Thy wis- dom, hear us, oh, hear ! 
loving kind - ness, Free as the sunlight, shed from a - bove. 

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Through all the darkness, Unto the dawning, 
To His beloved He givetb sleep. 
5 Thou in the morning. Thou at the evening, 
Ever be with us, helper anil friend, 

Through all earth's shadows, Past all its dangers, 
Father! Thv children keep and defend! 

-STREET. L. M. 



3 Hope like the rainbow smiles on the tempest, 

Faith like a starheam brightens the night, 

Morn may be shrouded, Noon may be weeping, 

Still " at the evening there shall be light." 

4 God watching o'er us, sleeps not, nor slumbers, 

Faithful night-watches His angels keep, 

PARK 



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1. God of the morn - ing, at whose voice 

2. From the fair chambers of the east 



The cheerful sun makes haste 
The cir - cuit of his race 



to 
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rise, 
gins, 



And like a 
And with - out 



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PARK-STREET. Concluded 



169 




gi - ant doth rejoice To run his journey through the skies, To run his jour - ney through the skies, 
wear-i - ness or rest, Round the whole earth he flies and shines, Round the whole earth he flies and shines. 
I 




3 Oh, like the sun, may I fulfill 

The appointed duties, of the day ; 
With ready mind and active will, 

March on and keep my heavenly way. 



4 But I shall rove and lose the race, 
If God, my sun. should disappear, 
And leave me in this world's wild maze 
To follow every wandering star. 

TALLIS' HYMN. L. M 



5 Give me thy counsel for my guide, 
And then receive me to thy bliss ; 
All my desires and hopes lie>ide 

Are faint and cold compared with this. 

TALLIS. 




S3 



1. Glo - ry to thee, my God, 

2. For - give me, Lord, thro' thy 



blessings of the light: Keep me, oh, keep me, 
I this day have done ; That with the world, my- 



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at peace may be. 



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3. 

Teach me to live, that I may dread 
The grave as little as my bed; 
Teach me to die, that so I may 
Rise glorious at thy judgment day. 

4. 
Be thou my guardian while I sleep, 
Thy watchful station near me keep ; 
My heart with love celestial fill, 
And guard me from th' approach of ilL 



170 



ORFORD. L. M. 



L. MASON. 




1. How sweet the light of Sabbath eve. How soft the sunbeams ling'ring there: For these blest hours the 

2. Tie time how lovely and how still ! Peace shines and smiles on all be-low; The plain, the stream, the 






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world I leave, Wafted on wings of praise and prayer, 
wood, the hill, All fair with evening's setting glow. 



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3. 

Season of rest ! the tranquil soul 

Feels the sweet calm and melts to love, 

And while these sacred moments roll, 
Faith sees a smiling heav'n above. 

4. 
Nor will our days of toil be long; 

Our pilgrimage will soon be trod, 
And we shall join the ceaseless song, 

The endless Sabbath of our God. 



DUKE-STREET. L. M. 



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1. No more, my God- 

2. Now, for the love 



■I boast no more Of all the du - ties I have done; I quit the hopes I 
I bear his name, What was my gain, I count my loss; My former pride I 




DUKE-STREET. Concluded. 



17i 




held be - fore, To trust the mer 
call my shame, And nail my glo 



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his 



Son. 




Yes. and I must and will esteem 
All things but loss for Jesus' sake; 

Oh, may my soul be found in him, 
And of his righteousness partake. 

4. 
The best obedience of my hands 

Dares not appear before thy throne; 
But faith can answer thy demands, 

By pleading what my Lord has done. 



COLCHESTER, C. M. 







1. Once more, my soul,the rising day Salutes my waking eyes; Once more, my voice, thy tribute pay To Him who rules the skies. 

2. Night unto night his name repeats, The day renews the sound, Wide as the heavens on which he sits To turn the seasons round. 



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3. 
'Tis he supports my mortal frame ; 

My tongue shall speak his praise ; 
My sins would rouse his wrath to flame, 

And yet his wrath delays 



4. 5. 

A thousand wretched souls are fled Great God, let all my hours he thine, 

Since the last setting sun, While I enjoy the light; 

And yet thou lengthenest out my thread, Then shall my sun in smiles decline, 

And yet my moments run And linug a pleasant night. 



172 



PETERBOROUGH. CM. 




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1. Hark! the glad sound, the Saviour comes, The Saviour promised long; Let every heart prepare a throne. And every voice a song. 
2. On him the Spirit, largely poured, Exerts its sacred fire ; Wisdom and might, and zeal, andlove, His holy hreast in - spire. 




3 He conies the pris'ners to release, 
In Satan's bondage held: 
The gates of brass before him burst, 
The iron fetters yield. 



4 He comes the broken heart to bind, 
The bleeding soul to cure : 
And with the treasures of his grace 
T' enrich the humble poor. 



15 Our glad hosannas, Prince of peace, 
Thy welcome shall proclaim ; 
And heaven's eternal arches ring 
I With thy beloved name. 



DEDHAM. C. M. 



GARDNER. 




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2 Ten thousand thousand precious gifts B Through every period of my life 



My daily thanks employ, 
Nor is the least a cheerful heart. 
That tastes those gifts with joy. 



Thy goodness I'll pursue; 
And after death, in distant worlds, 
The glorious theme, renew 



4 Through all eternity, to thee 

A joi ful song I'll raise : 

But Oh. eternity's too short 

To utter all thy praise ! 



Woodstock: c. m. 



DUTTON. 173 



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1. I love to steal awhile away From every cumbering care. And spend the hours of setting day In humble grateful praver. 

2. I love in sol - i-tude to shed The pen-i - ten - tial tear. And allHis promises to plead, Where none hut God can hear 

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3 I love to think on mercies past, 
And future good implore, 
And all my cares and sorrows cast 
On him whom I adore. 




4 I love by faith to take a view 
Of brighter scenes in heaven ; 
The prospect doth my strength renew, 
While here by tempests driven. 



5 Thus, when life's toilsome day is o'er, 
May its departing ray 
Be calm as this impressive hour, 
And lead to endless day. 



ARLINGTON. C. M. 






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1. Do not I love thee, O my Lord? Behold my heart and see; And turn each cursed idol out That dares to ri - val thee. 

2. Do not I love thee from niysoul? Then let me nothing love : Dead be my heart toevery joy, When Jesus cannot move. 



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3 Is not thy name melodious still 
To my attentive ear ? 
Doth not each pulse with pleasure 
bound 
My Saviour's voice to hear ? 



4 Hast thou a lamb in all thy flock 
I would disdain to feed ? 
Hast thou a foe, before whose 
face 
I fear thy cause to plead ? 



5 Thou know'st I love thee, dearest 
Lord ; 
But oh, I long to soar 
Far from the sphere of mortal joys, 
And learn to love thee more. 



CORONATION. CM. 



HOLDEN. 




1. AH hail the power of Je - sus' name, Let angels prostrate fall; Bring forth the royal <li - a- dem, And 

2. Crown him, ye martyrs of our God, Who from his al - tar call ; Ex- to] the stem of Jesse's rod. And 

3. Hail him, ye heirs of David's line, Whom David "Lord'' did call: The God incarnate ! Man divine ! And 

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crown him Lord 
crown him Lord 

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all ; Ex - tol the stem of Jes - se's rod, And crown him 
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Ye chosen seed of Israel's race, 
Ye ransomed from the fall. 

Hail him who saves von l>y his grace, 
And crown him Lord of all. 



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5 Sinners, whose love can never forget 
The worm-wood and the gall, 
Go, spread your trophies at his feet, 
And crown him Lord of all. 



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STEPHENS. C. M. 



6 Let every kindred, every tribe 
On this terrestial ball. 
To him all majesty ascribe. 
And crown him Lord of all. 

JONES. 




I. Prayer is 
'2. Prayer is 



the soul's sincere 
the bur - den of 



de-sire, Uttered 
a sigh, The fallin 



or unexpressed : The motion of a hidden tire Thai trembles in the breast, 
of a tear. The upward glancing of an eye, When none but God is near. 




- 1I zr\ i * i 



STEPHENS. Concluded. 



175 



8 Proyeris the Christian's vital breath, 14 

The Christian's native air, 
His watchword at the gates of death; 

He enters heaven with prayer. 



Prayer is the contrite sinner's voice, 
Keturning from his ways, 

While angels in their songs rejoice, 
And cry, "Behold, he prays." 

CHRISTMAS. C. M. 



5 thou by whom we come to God, 

The Life, the Truth, the Way, 
The path of prayer thyself hast trod" 
Lord, teach us how to pray. 



HANDEL. 



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wake, my soul, stretch ev - ery nerve, And press with vig - or on; 
cloud of wit - ness - es a - round Hold thee in full sur - vey; 



A heavenly 
For- get the 




3 'Tis God's all-animating voice 

That calls thee from on high; 
'Tis his own hand presents the prize 
To thine aspiring eye. 

4 That prize with peerless glories bright, 

Which shall new lustre boast 



When victor's wreaths and monarch's gems 

Shall blend in common dust. 
5 Blest Saviour, introduced by thee, 

Have I my race begun; 
And crowned with victory at thy feet 

I'll lav my honors down. 



176 



MAITLAND, or CROSS AND CROWN. C. M. 




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1. Must Jesus bear his cross alone, And all the world go free ? No, there's a cross for every one, And there's a cross for me. 



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Who once went sorrowing here; 
Bnt now they taste unmingled love, 
And joy without a tear. 



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3 The consecrated cross I'll bear 
Till death shall set me free, 
And then go home my crown to wear, 
For there's a crown for me. 

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2 Look how we grovel here below, 

Fond of these trifling toys; 
Our souls can neither fly nor go, 
To reach eternal joys. 

3 In vain we tune our formal songs, 

In vain we strive to rise; 
Hosaunas languish on our tongues, 
And our devotion dies. 



4 Dear Lord, and shall we ever live 

At this poor dying rate — 
Our love so faint, so cold to Thee, 
And thine to us so great ? 

5 Come, Holy Spirit, heavenly Dove, 

With all thy quickening powers ; 
Come, shed abroad a Saviour's love, 
And that shall kindle ours. 



BOOTH. 



From " Niw Sokqs o» Ziow," by permission. 177 






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1. We are on our jour - ney home.Where Christ our Lord is gone; We shall meet around his throne When he makes his people 

2. We can see that distant home, Tho' clouds roll dark between; Faith views the radiant dome, And a lustre flash- ei 

3. O glo - ry shhu-iug far From the never-set • timj sun; Oh trembling morning star, Our journey's al -most 



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done To the new Je 



ru - sa - lem, From the new Je - ru - sa - lem ; And a lus - tre flash - es 
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Oh holy, heavenly home ; 

Oh rest eternal there ; 
When shall the exiles come, 

Where they cease from earthly care, 
In the new Jerusalem. 

Our hearts are breaking now 
Those mansions fair to see ; 

O Lord, thy heavens bow, 
And raise us up with thee 
To the new Jerusalem. 



178 



SILVER-STREET. S. M. 




SMITh 






1. Awake, and sing the song Of Moses and the Lamb , Wake, every heart and every tongue, To praise t lie Saviour's name. 

2. Sing of his dying love, Sing of his rising power, Sing how he in • ter-cedes a - bove For those whose sins he bore. 

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3. 
Sing till we feel our heart 

Ascending with our tongue, 
Sing till the love of sin depart, 

And grace inspire our song. 

4. 
Sing on your heavenly way, 

Ye ransomed sinners, sing; 
Sing on, rejoicing every day 

In Christ th'eternal King. 



Soon shall we hear him say, 
"Ye blessed children, come;" 

Soon will he call us hence away, 
And take his wanderers home. 

6. 
Soon shall our raptured tongue 

His endless praise proclaim. 
And sweeter voices tune the song 

"Of Moses and the Lamb." 



ST. THOMAS. S. M. 



WILLIAMS. 



§1 










1. I love thy kingdom, Lord, The house of thine abode, The church our blest Redeemer saved With his own precious blood 

2. I love thy church, O God ; Her walls be - fore thee stand. Dear as the apple of thine eye, And graven on thy hand. 



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If e'er to bless her sons 

My voice or hands deny, 
These hands let useful skill forsake, 

This voice in silence die. 
4. 
If e'er my heart forget 

Her welfare or her woe, 
Let every joy this heart forsake, 

And every grief o'erflow. 
5. 
For her my tears shall fall, 

For her my prayers ascend; 
To her my cares and toils be given, 

Till toils and cares shall end. 



ST. THOMAS. Concluded. 

6. 

Beyond my highest joy 

I prize her heavenly ways, 
Her sweet communion, solemn vows. 

Her hymns of love and prais6. 
7. 
Jesus, thou Friend divine, 

Our Saviour and our King, 
Thy hand from every snare and foe 

Shall great deliverance bring. 



179 



Sure as thy truth shall last, 

To Zion shall be given 
The brightest glories earth can yield, 

And brighter bliss of heaven. 



SHIRLAND. 




S. M. 




1. Come, Holy Spirit, come ! Let thy bright beams arise; 




Dispel the sorrow from our mimls, The darkness from our eyes. 



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Convince us of our sin, 

Then lead to Jesus' blood; 
And to our wondering view reveal 

The secret love of God. 

3. 

Revive our drooping faith, 

Our doubts and fears remove; 
And kindle in our breasts the flame 

Of never-dying love. 



'T is thine to cleanse the heart, 

To sanctify the soul, 
To pour fresh life in every part, 

And new-create the whole. 
5. 
Dwell, Spirit, in our hearts, 

Our minds from bondage free; 
Then shall we know and praise and love 

The Father. Son, and Thea 



180 



DENNIS. S. M. 



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Arranged by De. L. MASub. 

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NAGELI. 




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1. Oh where shall rest be found — Rest for the 

2. The world can nev - er give The bliss for 

3. Be - yond this vale of tears There is a 
i. There is a death, whose pang Out - lasts the 



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life a - bove, Un - measured by the 

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years; And all that life is love, 

hang A round "the sec - ond death!'' 



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Lord God of truth and grace, 
Teach us that death to shun, 

Lest we be banished from thy face 
And evermore undone. 



Here would we end our quest : 
Alone are found in thee 

The life of perfect love, the rest 
Of immortality. 



SICILIAN HYMN. 8s & 7s. 



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1. Sweet the mo - ments, rich in blessing, Which before the cross I spend ; Life ami health and 

2. Love and grief my heart di - vid - ing, With my tears his feet I'll bathe ; Constant still in 

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181 



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Truly blessed is the station, 
Low before his cross to lie ; 

While I see divine compassion 
Beaming in his gracious eye. 

Here I'll sit, for ever viewing 
Mercy streaming in his blood — 

Precious drops my soul bedewing, 
Plead, and claim my peace with God. 



* DISMISSION. 8s, 7s & 4s. 



1 Lord, dismiss us with thy blessing, 
Fill our hearts with joy and peace ; 
Let us each, thy love possessing, 
Triumph in redeeming grace : 

Oh refresh us, 
Traveling through this wilderness. 



2 Thanks we give, and adoration, 
For thy gospel's joyful sound ; 
May the fruits of thy balvation 
In our hearts and lives abound; 

May thy presence 
With us evermore be found. 



3 Then, whene'er the signal's given 
Us from earth to call away, 
Borne on angel's wings to heaven — 
Glad the summons to obey — 

May we ever 
Reign with Christ in endless day. 



■}(■ Hay be sung by repeating the first two lines. 



PLEYELS HYMN. 

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I. Hark, the herald angels sing, "Glory to the new-born King! Peace on earth and mercy mild, God and sinners recon 



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Light and life to all he brings, 
Risen with healing in his wings. 
4 Mild he lay his glory by — 

Born, that man no more may die 
Born to raise the sons of earth ; 
Born to give them second birth. 



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2 Joyful, all ye nations rise, 
Join the triumph of the skies ; 
With th' angelic host proclaim, 
"Christ is born in Bethlehem." 

3 Hail the heaven-born Prince of peace ! 
Hail the Sun of righteousness ! 



182 



HORTON. 7s. 



WARTENSEE. 



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1. Ho - ly Bi - ble, book divine, 

2. Mine to chide me when I rove, 



Precious treasure, thou art mine ! Mine to tell me whence I 
Mine to show a Saviour's love; Mine art thou to guide my 




came, 
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3 Mine to comfort in distress, 
If the Holy Spirit bless; 
Mine to show by living faith, 
Man can triumph over death ; 

4 Mine to tell of joys to come, 
And the rebel sinner's doom : 
Oh thou precious book divine, 
Precious treasure, thou art mine ! 



HENDON. 7s. 



De. malan. 




1. To thy pastures fair and large, Heavenly Shepherd, lead thy charge, And my couch with tenderest care, 'Mid the 

2. When I faint with summer's heat, Thou shalt guide my weary feet To the streams that, still and slow, Thro' the 



IIENDON. Concluded. 




springing grass pre - pare, 'Mid the springing grass prepare, 
ver-dant meadows flow, Thro' the ver - dant meadows flow. 



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183 

Safe the dreary vale I tread, 
By the shadesof death o'erspread, 
With thy rod and staff supplied — 
This my guard, and that my guide. 

Constant to my latest end, 
Thou my footsteps shalt attend, 
And shalt bid thy hallowed dome 
Yield me an eternal home. 



AMSTERDAM. 7s & 6s. 



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, S Rise, my soul, and stretch thy wings, Thy better portion trace; ) 
' ( Rise from transitory things Towards heaven, thy native place : ) Sun, 
n \ Riv - ers to the ocean run, Nor stay in all their course; ) 

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Rise, my soul, and haste a - way To seats prepared a - bove. 
Upward tends to his a - bode, To rest in his embrace. 

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Cease, ye pilgrims, cease to mourn, 

Press onward to the prize; 
Soon your Saviour will return, 

Triumphant in the skies: 
Yet a season, and you know 

Happy entrance will be given; 
All your sorrows left below, 

And earth exchanged for heaven. 



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PORTUGUESE HYMN. lis. 



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1. How firm a found-ation, ye saints of the Lord, Is laid for your faith in his ex-cellent word: What 

2. Fear not, I am with thee: oh, be not dismayed, For I am thy God, and will still give thee aid: I'll 

3. When tnrough the deep waters I call thee to go, Theriv-ersof sorrow shall not o -ver- flow; For 



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more can he say than to you he hath said, Who un - to the Saviour for refuge have fled, Who 
strengthen thee, help thee, and cause thee to stand, Up - held by my righteous, om-ni - potent hand, Up- 
I will be with thee thy tri - als to bless, And sanc-ti - fy to thee thy deepest dis-tress, And 



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un - to "the Saviour for refuge have fled. 

held by my righteous, omni - po - tent hand. 

sancti- fy to thee thy deepest dis - tress. 



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4 When through fiery trials thy pathway shall lie, 
My grace, all-sufficient, shall lie thy supply: 
The flame shall not hurt thee; I only design 
Thy dross to consume, and thy gold to refine. 

5 E'en down to old age all my people shall prove 
My sovereign, eternal, unchangeable love; 

And then when gray hairs shall their temples adorn, 
Like lambs they shall still in my bosom be borne. 

6 The soul that on Jesus hath leaned for repose, 
I will not, I will not desert to his foes: 

That soul, though all hell should endeavor to shake. 
I'll never, no never, no never forsake. 



DULCIMER, lis & 8s. 



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2. Where dost thou at noon- tide re - sort 

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with thy sheep, To feed on the pastures of love ? Say 



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why in the val - ley of death should I 

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3 O why should I wander an alien from thee, 

Or cry in the desert for bread? 
Thy foes will rejoice when my sorrows they see, 
And smile at the tears I have shed. 

4 Restore, my dear Saviour, the light of thy face, 

Thy soul-cheering favor impart ; 
And let thy sweet tokens of pardoning grace 
Bring joy to my desolate heart. 

CHRIST THE BELOVED, lis & 8s 

1 Te daughters of Zion, declare, have ye seen 

The star that on Israel shone ? 
Say if in your tents my Beloved has been, 
And where with his flock he has gone. 

2 His voice, as the sound of the dulcimer sweet, 

Is heard through the shadows of death ; 
The cedars of Lebanon bow at his feet, 
The air is perfumed with his breath. 



3 His lips as a fountain of righteousness flow, 

To water the gardens of grace; 
Prom which their salvation the Gentiles shall know, 
And bask in the smiles of his face. 

4 He looks, and ten thousands of angels rejoice, 

And myriads wait for his word ; 
He speaks, and eternity, filled with his voice, 
Re-echoes the praise of the Lord. 

JOYFUL PRAISE TO GOD. 11a &. 8«. 

1 Be joyful in God, all ye lands of the earth, 

Oh, serve him with. gladness and fear; 
Exult in his presence with music and mirth, 
With love and devotion draw near. 

2 Por good is the Lord, inexpressibly good, 

And we are the work of his hand ; 
His mercy and truth from eternity stood. 
And shall to eternitv stand. 



186 



LYONS. 10s & lis. 




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O praise ye the Lord, prepare your glad voice, His praise in the great as - sembly to sing: In 
Let them his great name devout - ly a - dore ; In loud-swelling strains his praises express, Who 



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their great Cre - a -tor let all men rejoice, And heirs of sal - va - tion be glad in their King, 
gra - cious-ly o - pens his bounti - ful store, Their wants to relieve and his children to bless. 



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With glory adorned, his people shall sing 
To God, who defence and plenty supplies : 

Their loud acclamations to him their great King, 
Through earth shall be sounded, and reach to the 
skies. 



Ye angels above, his glories who've sung, 
In loftiest notes now publish his praise : 

We mortals, delighted, would borrow your tongue - 
Would join in your numbers, and chant to youi 
lays. 



A SONG OF PRAISE. 10s & lis. 



1 Ye servants of God, your Master proclaim, 
And publish abroad his wonderful name ; 
The name all victorious of Jesus extol : 
His kingdom is glorious, he rules over all. 

2 God ruleth on high, almighty to save ; 
And still he is nigh, his presence we have. 
The great congregation his triumph shall sing, 
Ascribing salvation to Jesus our King. 



Salvation to God, who sits on the throne, 
Let all cry aloud, and honor the Son : 
The praises of Jesus the angels proclaim, 
Fall down on their faces and worship the Lamb. 
Then let us adore, and give him his right, 
All glory and power and wisdom and might ; 
All honor and blessing, with angels above, 
And thanks never ceasing, and infinite love. 



INDEX. 



A boy is a boy 64 

A call to labor 44 

A farmer I will be 32 

"All is quiet" 148 

A victory 144 

Away, dull care 50 

Away to the woods 116 

Bear him to an early tomb 131 

Beautiful morning 112 

Beautiful spring 63 

Be kind to one another 23 

Be still 77 

Boat song 37 

Break, break, break 100 

Bugle song 93 

Carpe diem 103 

Columbia, the gem of the ocean. 159 

Don't leave the farm 28 

Do right 5> 

Echoes 96 

Evening Hymn 118 

Evening Song 117 

Evening Twilight. 82 

Fatherland 134 

For the truth, for the right .... 52 

Freedom's day (lor male VOlCeS) 149 

Give 19 



Give place 98 

Go ahead 16 

God on the ocean 76 

God save the flag 152 

God's world is bathed in beauty 96 

Golden days 89 

Good.moniing 115 

Good-night 120 

Greeting song 121 

Hail to the land 1M8 

Happy hours 15 

Hark, the song 1 39 

Help it on 43 

Home again 62 

Home of my childhood, farewell 58 

Home of the brave 137 

Home-sickness 60 

Hunting-song 27 

In the woods 91 

Joy ! joy ! 142 

Keep on trying 17 

Kindness 102 

Land of beauty 70 

Laughter 48 

Liberty 153 

Little Nell 72 

Little things 1 29 



Make the home happy 24 

Make the world better 26 

Memories of childhood 65 

Memory . . 1 23 

Midnight wind 87 

Moonlight 84 

Morning hymn 114 

Morning twilight 81 

Music and dances 97 

Nature's call 88 

Neighbor Dobbs 158 

Nellie lost and found 94 

Nothing to give 25 

Now 47 

0, give me the heart that is tender 56 

One by one 51 

Onward and upward 18 

Our festal-day 126 

Parting Song 122 

Pilgrim Song 132 

Popular Sovereignty 1 36 

Rest at evening 69 

Rest in toil 67 

Santa Claus 128 

Shall we meet beyond the river. . 183 

Sweeten vour toil with a song. . . 108 

(Concluded) 109 



188 

Sign the pledge 31 

Sitting by a meadow brook. 33 

Skating 34 

Sleep, gentle sister 124 

Sleigh-ride song 36 

3oft and lovely evening 119 

Softly sweet 99 

Something left undone 45 

Song of the hunters, (for maleroieei.) 40 

Song of the skaters 35 

Sons of the chase, awake 49 

Spring 78 

Spring is coming 73 

Step by step 22 

Student's Lay 20 

Summer longings 79 

Sunbeams 61 

The battle-cry of Freedom 162 



INDEX. Concluded. 



The charge, (for male roieei.) 140 

The Christmas tree 126 

The Cuckoo Ill 

The Days of yore 106 

The fisher-boy 38 

The Flag 154 

The Flag of the Free 156 

The Fountain 135 

The Hero's orphan girls 146 

The hunter's horn 42 

The last days of Autumn 80 

The Mariner's grave 74 

The messenger bird 83 

The money-king 110 

The night is still 75 

The old house on the hilL 92 

The old school-book 64 

The old year 130 

The orphan's prayer 57 

• ■ • ■ » 



The patriot dead at Gettysburg 143 

The rail 105 

There's rest up abovo 168 

The resting-place 66 

The Spirit's lullaby 86 

The star-spangled banner 164 

The stream of life 59 

The tri-color 157 

The true hero 55 

Tho water ! the water ! 90 

The winds 85 

The workers 46 

'Tis dawn 113 

Truth 104 

Under the willow 71 

What's the use? 21 

When we are twenty-one 30 



DEVOTIONAL DEPARTMENT. 



A song of praise 186 

Amsterdam 183 

Arlington 173 

Booth 177 

Christ the beloved. 185 

Christmas 175 

Colchester 171 

Coronation 174 

Dedham 172 

Dennis 180 

Dismission 181 

Duke Street 170 

Dulcimer 185 



Dundee 176 

Hendon 182 

Horton 182 

Jesus ever near 167 

Joyful praise to God 185 

Lyons 186 

Maitland 176 

Morning Prayer 1C6 

Oxford 170 

Park Street 168 

Peterborough 172 



Pleyel's Hymn 181 

Portugese Hymn 184 

Prayer, (for male roieei.) 168 

Shirland 179 

Sicilian Hymn 180 

Silver Street 178 

Stevens 174 

St. Thomas 178 

Tallis Hymn 169 

The Pasture 166 

Woodstock 174 



"CARMINA YALENSIA," 

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